Todayilearned todayilearned

TIL that the difference between coffins and caskets is that coffins are usually tapered and six-sided, whereas caskets are rectangular.

TIL that the difference between coffins and caskets is that coffins are usually tapered and six-s...

Within [some segments of] the funerary industry, “casket” is the preferred term (regardless of shape) because it’s considered to sound less ghoulish. ⚰️

(ETA: Bracketed clarification.)

Well you're wrong because coffins are usually tapered and six-sided, whereas caskets are rectangular.

Oh I thought they were synonyms

So a rectangle doesn’t have 6 sides?

TIL That the Guinness Book of World Records started because a manager of the beer company wanted to know what the fastest game bird ever recorded was and got annoyed when he couldn't find out.

TIL That the Guinness Book of World Records started because a manager of the beer company wanted to know what the fastest game bird ever recorded was and got annoyed when he couldn't find out.
TIL That the Guinness Book of World Records started because a manager of the beer company wanted ...

Well it would depend, are we talking about African or European game birds?

In 1951, Beaver shot at a game bird and missed, leading the party to wonder about the fastest game bird in existence.

The lack of information continued to nag Beaver, who went on to discover that there was no single official record of the fastest game bird — or much of anything else, for that matter. With the help of Norris and Ross McWhirter, journalists who also were brothers, Beaver amassed records into a book published in the summer of 1955. The 50,000 copies of the book, complete with water-repellent covers, were meant primarily as promotional items for the Guinness brewery, but Beaver soon realized he'd tapped into a public curiosity much like his own. And, not only did lots of people want to know who and what held the world record for all manner of things, they wanted to hold world records of their own.

See, lads? Told you it wasn't my lousy shooting! That motherfucker's just fast.

Maybe I'm just a naive 37-year-old but it never occurred to me that Guinness (beer) and Guinness (world records) were associated with each other

these days Guinness World Records and the beer company are no longer officially linked.

The early years must have been fun.

TIL The East India Company controlled its own army, which by 1800 comprised some 200,000 soldiers, more than twice the membership of the British Army at that time. The army was used to carry out officially sanctioned looting within Indian States, along with forced over-taxation.

TIL The East India Company controlled its own army, which by 1800 comprised some 200,000 soldiers, more than twice the membership of the British Army at that time. The army was used to carry out officially sanctioned looting within Indian States, along with forced over-taxation.
TIL The East India Company controlled its own army, which by 1800 comprised some 200,000 soldiers...

So wait. They basically had a corporate army, and enforced their own laws.

It's like... low-tech Cyberpunk dystopia shit going on!

1800s Britain is really interesting. The British government had no real institutions at that time, most was Royal or otherwise private. Even the Bank of England was a private bank. So when Britain colonised the ‘world’ it wasn’t really Britain but corporations that swear allegiance to the crown. Also, during the second half of the 1800s the East India company was in a big spat with the crown which nearly erupted in a civil war, it was adverted when parliament chose to dissolve the company and limit its powers.

Source. (#2)

It’s pretty insane to think it was over twice the size of the British army, meaning it would have been totally possible for a major governmental overthrow by the EIC had there been issues between the two mutually exclusive giants.

Edit: Holy guacamole I’ve been gilded. Thanks a ton stranger!

Also known as the Honourable East India Company; 200,000 hardworking mercenaries looting India full time

TIL The Vikings are responsible for the widespread populace of domestic felines across the world, as they were used for mousing on Viking ships throughout history.

TIL The Vikings are responsible for the widespread populace of domestic felines across the world, as they were used for mousing on Viking ships throughout history.
TIL The Vikings are responsible for the widespread populace of domestic felines across the world,...

Source.

I had no idea how prevalent cats were in Norse mythos and culture. After reading into it even more, it seems the culture rivals even Egyptian culture when it comes to felines! Who knew?

Virtually every ship since the Phoenicians has had a cat on board.

Tonight one of my four cats knocked over a crystal vase. The cat is fine, and there was no damage done. Just a trivial mess to clean up, and a repositioning of some articles on a foyer table. But thanks to the butterfly effect the Vikings are still causing havoc in 2018.

Just watched 'The Lion in Your Living Room' last night on Netflix and apparently the Vikings loved ginger cats. Everywhere the Vikings went a rise/appearance in ginger cats soon followed.

TIL in 2017, the chairman of the company that 'leaked' Kim Kardashian's sex tape admitted that Kim sold it to them.

TIL in 2017, the chairman of the company that 'leaked' Kim Kardashian's sex tape admitted that Ki...

A reminder that Kim was an assistant for Paris Hilton. She saw how a sex tape helped her career and wow wouldn’t you know it a sex tape “accidentally” leaked.

"Pornhub,com, which hosts the 41-minute video, reports: It is viewed by someone on an average of every 1.5 seconds"

Every 1.5 seconds?! God damn.

"However, the legend of their sex tape has lived on and they continue to ride the gravy train, with Ray reportedly raking in $90k a month from."

What the fuck! Imagine making one sex tape and making 90k a month for the rest of your life.

Too bad she didn't have a good name for her sex tape. One Night in Paris is ingenious.

At this point its probably Ray J's main source of income. Not too shabby

ETA: changed only to main.

TIL Mythbusters has saves lives: a woman trapped in her car as it filled with water recalled the episode with the Underwater Car Myth and waited until the pressure equalized to open the door.

TIL Mythbusters has saves lives: a woman trapped in her car as it filled with water recalled the episode with the Underwater Car Myth and waited until the pressure equalized to open the door.
TIL Mythbusters has saves lives: a woman trapped in her car as it filled with water recalled the ...

I hit a patch of slushy snow and went off into the water. Our car was filling up with water, it was happening so fast. I crawled through the vehicle, got into the back seat with Emily, unstrapped her from her car seat and I tried the driver’s side door — that door wouldn’t open. I had Emily in my arms trying to keep her out of the water and I’m going, ‘Oh my gosh, I need to get us out of here’ and then the MythBusters thing came to mind. I was like, OK, I have to wait. Even though I didn’t want to, I had to wait ’til the pressure equalized in the vehicle so I could get the door open. I waited until that moment, pushed the door open and it opened like nothing. I swam-walked and held Emily above my head to keep her out of the water and got onto the road.

Oh wow, that's terrifying, considering that we're in the winter season now. It's great that the women was able to recall that advice - it seems contrary to common sense but really works

Your life's flashing before your eyes, you're trying to save yourself and your daughter from a watery doom, and suddenly Jamie Hyneman's mustachioed visage appears into your mind and says "Of course, the best survival technique is just don't drive into the water in the first place."

When the car has FULLY been filled with water. The urge to escape before then is very high. You need an iron will to stay calm and in your seat while the sea tries to drown you.

How does one know when the pressure has equalized?

TIL Before committing suicide with gas, composer Peter Warlock locked his cat outside so that it wouldn't die with him.

TIL Before committing suicide with gas, composer Peter Warlock locked his cat outside so that it ...

Did he have to lock it though, must have been a smart cat.

This is actually EXACTLY how someone I worked with commit suicide, about 8.5 years ago.

Acquired gas. Sealed up his bathroom. Slapped a hazmat sticker on the door as a warning to police/family/fire brigade. Fed his cat. Went in.

He was a nice guy too. Wouldn't hurt a fly.

Edit: Wow, did not expect this response. I've added a bit more information below, given my original comment was very "bullet-pointed" and direct.

Just to answer the most common question I've seen in the comments: I'm not sure what gas was used. I'm not very familiar with the suicide-by-gas method, but I might do a bit more research. However it's not something I would post here as I don't want to turn this into me providing the best ways to go. I only knew him, not his family (who lived interstate), so it wasn't something I could really get an answer to. And he lived by himself (no wife, kids, etc). But it also never crossed my mind to try to find out about the type of gas.

Some info regarding his final days - After two days our mutual friend called the police and said he had a horrible feeling as no one had heard from him for a few days, and he hadn't turned up to work. He took responsibility for the door being busted in by the cops/fire brigade. A few minutes later a cop came out and gave my friend a soft nod and looked down, and then told him it was probably best if he headed home as they had control of it now. Damn, just writing that still hits me like its fresh. Suicide has such an eery feeling about it. Especially when you have information about their last moments. And it must be harrowing for our emergency services to find people every day.

Or did the cat lock him in?!?

Are we sure the cat didn't lock him in the room instead? I mean the guy is dead so who can confirm this....

TIL apes never ask questions. Apes are able to learn sign language and even communicate using it, apes have never attempted to learn new knowledge by asking humans or other apes. Apes can't realize that others can know things they don't. It's a concept that separates humans from apes.

TIL apes never ask questions. Apes are able to learn sign language and even communicate using it,...

I know many, many people who think they know everything, so....

Separates Humans from other Apes, because humans are Apes. Thanks for coming to my Ted Talk.

There was one, an African Gray Parrot named Alex. He asked what color he is. However, it is debated whether or not Alex understood what he said.

Can confirm me ape me know everything

Try one of these subthreads