Space space

Lunar Eclipse Time Lapse

Lunar Eclipse Time Lapse

"The blood moon rises once again. Please be careful, Link."

Kinda gives you the full spectrum of Earth’s shadow. And here I thought cloud shadows were special.

Can someone explain why it turns red? I would've expected it to just stay a darker shade of gray.

The lower wavelengths of light from the Sun are still able to sorta curve around the Earth to reflect off the Moon's surface and reach us, because the Sun, the Earth, and the Moon weren't fully aligned.

Entering a Black Hole

Entering a Black Hole

It’s from Space Engine and is posted here once every couple weeks for free karma.

I like to see different depictions of what entering a black hole would look like. Is this from a specific model?

Is this what a steam summer sale looks like if you're a wallet?

Space wouldn't disappear like that behind you into blackness. It would warp and colorshift only to half way, almost like a 50/50 split between blackness and space, and (Theoretically) you would see the entire existence of the universe pass right before you hit the singularity. This is also assuming you are immune to the tidal forces of the black hole.

I had a lot of fun capturing this 4 image Milky Way pano at Rocky Mountain National Park, CO. This method of shooting yielded extreme detail of the galactic core, but it also enhanced the glow of light pollution on the horizon.

I had a lot of fun capturing this 4 image Milky Way pano at Rocky Mountain National Park, CO. This method of shooting yielded extreme detail of the galactic core, but it also enhanced the glow of light pollution on the horizon.
I had a lot of fun capturing this 4 image Milky Way pano at Rocky Mountain National Park, CO. This method of shooting yielded extreme detail of the galactic core, but it also enhanced the glow of light pollution on the horizon.

Hey folks! So this is a new technique of shooting the stars for me so there are going to be things I have not quite mastered. The point of shooting a Milky Way pano is to bring fourth more detail in our galaxy. With that said, you are not going to see the Milky Way like this with the naked eye.

For starters, I used a device called a star tracker, which enables extremely long exposure at night, far more than what the human eye is capable. Secondly, I also took four images and blended them together. These four images were taken at a slightly longer focal length than a typical Milky Way shot, therefore enhancing detail in itself.

With that all said, Rocky Mountain National Park provides great easy access to viewing out cosmos. Despite light pollution seen in this shot from Denver, it is still very dark. This was taken at Forest Canyon Overlook, just off the Trail Ridge Drive. No need to hike, just make sure you stay hydrated up there.

I used my Nikon D850, Sigma 35mm f/1.4 ART, and iOptron Skyguider Pro. Each shot was 2 minutes, f/2.8, ISO 800. Two were tracked for the stars, two untracked for the landscape. Blended with adjustments in LR and PS.

Hey OP, I think this is stunning, and I would actually love it on my desktop background. Is there a way you can send this to me in your best quality?

If Saturn flew by Earth at 0.99c

If Saturn flew by Earth at 0.99c
If Saturn flew by Earth at 0.99c

Wouldn't Saturn appear distorted (compressed) in the direction of motion? Also, wouldn't Saturn appear bluer as it's approaching and redder as it's receding?

Wouldn't the Earth - or at least its atmosphere - be ripped apart/away by gravity before you could see Saturn getting redder?

I love the details people are getting into about how this would actually work. But for me, I'm just going to go with:

This would be fucking terrifying.

Pretty cool though. Still screaming if I saw it, but cool.

Apollo 15 view of a crescent Earth from the Moon

Apollo 15 view of a crescent Earth from the Moon

There's something I love about space photos that are not perfect. The out of focus window edge on this photo makes it 100x more interesting to me.

This would be a PERFECT album cover for something

I get what you mean — imperfections like that add a certain relatability and grounding that most space photos don’t have, making them feel more real.

I don't know about you but....as much as I wish we could have proper space travel (maybe not like the shows we see, but....something like that), I don't know if I could do it.

Just seeing this makes me feel very small, and very insignificant.

Scariest image I've seen

Scariest image I've seen

That person must have experienced some of the most peaceful, but also stressful moments in human history.

The guy in the suit was a test pilot. Guarantee you that he loved every second of it.

Since nobody else has mentioned it yet, this is Bruce McCandless testing a Manned Maneuvering Unit during STS-41-B. He floated 320 feet away from the Space Shuttle.

radio scratchy noises

Space station, reporting McCandless orbital speed at steady 15,000 miles per hour.

Break.

How's the walk McCandless?!

delay and radio noise

"WOOOOooooo!!!!!! I'm peeing!!!!! At 15,000 mph! Tell my old boss, fuck 'em!!!"

Fjord and Milkway 100 Megapixels

Fjord and Milkway 100 Megapixels

The way my phones bit rate plummets is beautiful

Lovely picture... but the image file itself is badly upscaled. :/ Do you have the original file?

If you zoom way in you can see each star is a streak, because long exposure, and deduce that north is off to the right.

check their post history. it’s a photoshop composite of multiple pictures that aren’t their own.

First photo of the whole Earth taken by a human in space

First photo of the whole Earth taken by a human in space

AS-08-16-2593 is the first whole-Earth image photographed directly by a human. It was taken during the Apollo 8 mission, most likely by Bill Anders. South is approximately to the upper right and the image is dominated by the landmass of South America. Central America and Florida is towards the bottom of the image with the west coast of Africa at top left. It was taken about four hours into the mission.

Would you be able to detect any cloud movement with the naked eye watching the earth from this distance? I.e. would it appear to be "alive", or is it too slow to detect?

I’m going with probably too slow. Maybe like an hour hand on a clock. You can watch it move if you sit there for ten minutes or so

Pfft, obviously not a photo of the whole Earth, it's just one side of it. You totally can't see the other side. Also there's a bit in the shadow.

40% of the Earth at best. /s

Try one of these subthreads