socialism

Denmark being Denmark

Denmark being Denmark

Lol Denmark is neoliberal as fuck.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flexicurity

SCANDINAVIA IS NOT SOCIALIST

Affordable healthcare sure. But in order to bring back socialism it needs to be there in the first place.

"Socialism doesn't work"

"Socialism doesn't work"

the difference is that a capitalist system is designed around that happening, whereas a socialist system pretends it will not. when this scenario inevitably happens in a socialist system you have no recourse.

capitalism: here's how people naturally behave and it's pretty shitty. let's start with the assumption they will do this and then try to work around it so we have a stable society socialism: here's how i want people to behave, which is better than their shitty instincts. let's start with the assumption that this system won't be subverted and instead focus on its strengths.

"Socialism doesn't work! Look at the Soviet Union!"

Look at Russia today, isn't that an indictment of capitalism?

"Nah man that place has always been a shithole"

Its like nailing jello to a wall.

Capitalism sure as ell doesn’t work, I know that.

Can you be more specific?

Awesome facts about Cuba since the Revolution: HASTA SIEMPRE!

Awesome facts about Cuba since the Revolution: HASTA SIEMPRE!
Cuba ranked 3th in the world for literacy: http://world.bymap.org/LiteracyRates.html

Free quality healthcare: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Healthcare_in_Cuba

Free quality education: A 1998 study by UNESCO reported that Cuban students showed a high level of educational achievement. Cuban third and fourth graders scored 350 points, 100 points above the regional average in tests of basic language and mathematics skills. The report indicated that the test achievement of the lower half of students in Cuba was significantly higher than the test achievement of the upper half of students in other Central and South American countries in the study group.[14][15]

The 1998 study by UNESCO was particularly impressive, because for the first time all of the countries in the study had agreed on the indicators and procedures in advance. Also, the study was taken during the height of an economic depression; Cuba’s economic development has been severely restricted by the U.S. trade embargo. Cuba is one of the poorest countries in the region and lacks basic resources yet still leads Latin America in primary education in terms of standardized testing.[16]

The facts of a relatively poor economy and a long-term continuous sanctions on trade makes the Cubans' achievements more impressive. For the past forty years, education has been a top priority for the Cuban government.[17] Cuba maintains twice the amount of public spending on education as its more wealthy neighbors, at 10% of GNP https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Cuba#Level_of_achievement

Racism: Article detailing the history of racism, and how Castro combat it through anti-discriminatory laws with overwhelming support, that is conveyed today: http://www.afrocubaweb.com/News/whyblackcubans.htm


Also Pre-revolutionary Cuba was, in effect, an apartheid society. There was widespread segregation and discrimination. Afro-Cubans were restricted to the worst jobs, the worst housing, the worst education. They suffered from differential access to parks, restaurants and beaches. The revolution quickly started attacking racism at its roots, vowing to “straighten out what history has twisted.” In March 1959, just a couple of months after the capture of power, Fidel discussed the complex problem of racism in several speeches at mass rallies. “In all fairness, I must say that it is not only the aristocracy who practise discrimination. There are very humble people who also discriminate. There are workers who hold the same prejudices as any wealthy person, and this is what is most absurd and sad … and should compel people to meditate on the problem. Why do we not tackle this problem radically and with love, not in a spirit of division and hate? Why not educate and destroy the prejudice of centuries, the prejudice handed down to us from such an odious institution as slavery?” The commitment to defeating racism has brought about tremendous gains in equality and racial integration. Isaac Saney writes: “It can be argued that Cuba has done more than any other country to dismantle institutionalised racism and generate racial harmony.” Of course, deeply ingrained prejudices and inequalities cannot be eliminated overnight, and problems remain, especially as a result of the ‘special period’ in which Cuba has had to open itself up to tourism and some limited foreign investment. Racism thrives on inequality. However, Cuba remains a shining light in terms of its commitment to racial equality. Assata Shakur, the famous exiled Black Panther who has lived in Cuba for several decades, puts it well: “Revolution is a process, so I was not that shocked to find sexism had not totally disappeared in Cuba, nor had racism, but that although they had not totally disappeared, the revolution was totally committed to struggling against racism and sexism in all their forms. That was and continues to be very important to me. It would be pure fantasy to think that all the ills, such as racism, classism or sexism, could be dealt with in 30 years. But what is realistic is that it is much easier and much more possible to struggle against those ills in a country which is dedicated to social justice and to eliminating injustice.” Isaac Saney cites a very moving and revealing anecdote recounted by an elderly black man in Cuba: “I was travelling on a very crowded bus. At a bus stop, where many people got off, a black man got a seat. A middle aged woman said in a very loud and irritated voice: ‘And it had to be a black who gets the seat.’ The response of the people on the bus was incredible. People began to criticize the woman, telling her that a revolution was fought to get rid of those stupid ideas; that the black man should be viewed as having the same rights as she had – including a seat on a crowded bus. The discussion and criticism became loud and animated. The bus driver was asked to stop the bus because the people engaging in the criticism had decided that the woman expressing racist attitudes must get off the bus. For the rest of my trip, the people apologized to the black comrade and talked about where such racist attitudes come from and what must be done to get rid of them.” https://prolecenter.wordpress.com/2013/07/26/20-reasons-to-support-cuba/


Cuban woman rights record (ranked 6th in the world for women political participation): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women%27s_rights_in_Cuba

Cuba Number 1 for Sustainable Development: WWF: https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/As-World-Burns-Cuba-Number-1-For-Sustainable-Development-WWF-20161027-0018.html

From Leo Humberman and Paul Sweezy's "Cuba anatomy of a revolution: "Note that in all of Cuba (from the 1953 census), in both urban and rural areas, only 35.2% of the dwelling units have running water, and only 28% have inside flush toilets. In 2015, about 95% of Cubans had access to an improved water source (96% of the urban population, but only 92% of the rural population). Cuba's access to adequate sanitation is the second-highest in Latin America and the Caribbean after Uruguay: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_supply_and_sanitation_in_Cuba#Access

There may be a bit of a discrepancy here about the electricity. Rural areas in Cuba before 1959 only had ranging 5.8% to 9.1%, according to sources (7% average). But average homes overall were about 50%: 


In 1959, only about 50% of households in the island nation had access to electricity. By 1989, the electric grid provided service to 95% of household. https://www.edf.org/sites/default/files/cuban-electric-grid.pdf


Ironically, the electricity before the revolution was ran by an American-owned electric power company, and was riddled with corruption (from the same book from above): https://i.imgur.com/KG08tKh.png

For hunger and poverty: 


Over the last 50 years, comprehensive social protection programmes have largely eradicated poverty and hunger. Food-based social safety nets include a monthly food basket for the entire population, school feeding programmes, and mother-and-child health care programmes. Although effective, these programmes mostly rely on food imports and strain the national budget. In 2011, in the context of efforts to make the economy more efficient, the government announced plans to make social protection more sustainable and streamlined, with an emphasis on the most vulnerable groups along “no one left behind” lines. http://www1.wfp.org/countries/cuba


First country to develop Lung cancer, meningitus vaccines and HIV mother-to-child prevention: https://elpais.com/elpais/2017/02/10/inenglish/1486729823_171276.html

Free training for international students: https://www.wired.com/2016/03/students-ditching-america-medical-school-cuba/


Cuba is the largest and most populated island in the Caribbean yet consistently experiences the lowest death tolls during hurricane season.[5] According to United Nations, it's not because Cubans are lucky but because they're prepared.[6] According to Oxfam, from 1996 to 2002, only 16 people were killed by the six hurricanes that struck Cuba.[7]


Cuba's meteorological institute has 15 provincial offices.[citation needed] They share data with US scientists and project storm tracks. Around 72 hours before a storm's predicted landfall, national media issue alerts while civil protection committees check evacuation plans and shelters. Hurricane awareness is taught in schools and there are practice drills for the public before each hurricane season.[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuba_emergency_response_system

Operation Miracle (A third of Cuba's 75,000 doctors, along with 10,000 other health workers, are currently working in 77 poor countries, including El Salvador, Mali and East Timor. This still leaves one doctor for every 220 people at home, one of the highest ratios in the world, compared with one for every 370 in England.): https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/cuban-medics-in-haiti-put-the-world-to-shame-2169415.html

And Haiti: https://www.counterpunch.org/2010/04/01/cuban-medical-aid-to-haiti/

Took me a while to get these source, so enjoy!

Cuba ranked 3th in the world for literacy: http://world.bymap.org/LiteracyRates.html

Free quality healthcare: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Healthcare_in_Cuba

Free quality education: A 1998 study by UNESCO reported that Cuban students showed a high level of educational achievement. Cuban third and fourth graders scored 350 points, 100 points above the regional average in tests of basic language and mathematics skills. The report indicated that the test achievement of the lower half of students in Cuba was significantly higher than the test achievement of the upper half of students in other Central and South American countries in the study group.[14][15]

The 1998 study by UNESCO was particularly impressive, because for the first time all of the countries in the study had agreed on the indicators and procedures in advance. Also, the study was taken during the height of an economic depression; Cuba’s economic development has been severely restricted by the U.S. trade embargo. Cuba is one of the poorest countries in the region and lacks basic resources yet still leads Latin America in primary education in terms of standardized testing.[16]

The facts of a relatively poor economy and a long-term continuous sanctions on trade makes the Cubans' achievements more impressive. For the past forty years, education has been a top priority for the Cuban government.[17] Cuba maintains twice the amount of public spending on education as its more wealthy neighbors, at 10% of GNP https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Cuba#Level_of_achievement

Racism: Article detailing the history of racism, and how Castro combat it through anti-discriminatory laws with overwhelming support, that is conveyed today: http://www.afrocubaweb.com/News/whyblackcubans.htm

Also Pre-revolutionary Cuba was, in effect, an apartheid society. There was widespread segregation and discrimination. Afro-Cubans were restricted to the worst jobs, the worst housing, the worst education. They suffered from differential access to parks, restaurants and beaches. The revolution quickly started attacking racism at its roots, vowing to “straighten out what history has twisted.” In March 1959, just a couple of months after the capture of power, Fidel discussed the complex problem of racism in several speeches at mass rallies. “In all fairness, I must say that it is not only the aristocracy who practise discrimination. There are very humble people who also discriminate. There are workers who hold the same prejudices as any wealthy person, and this is what is most absurd and sad … and should compel people to meditate on the problem. Why do we not tackle this problem radically and with love, not in a spirit of division and hate? Why not educate and destroy the prejudice of centuries, the prejudice handed down to us from such an odious institution as slavery?” The commitment to defeating racism has brought about tremendous gains in equality and racial integration. Isaac Saney writes: “It can be argued that Cuba has done more than any other country to dismantle institutionalised racism and generate racial harmony.” Of course, deeply ingrained prejudices and inequalities cannot be eliminated overnight, and problems remain, especially as a result of the ‘special period’ in which Cuba has had to open itself up to tourism and some limited foreign investment. Racism thrives on inequality. However, Cuba remains a shining light in terms of its commitment to racial equality. Assata Shakur, the famous exiled Black Panther who has lived in Cuba for several decades, puts it well: “Revolution is a process, so I was not that shocked to find sexism had not totally disappeared in Cuba, nor had racism, but that although they had not totally disappeared, the revolution was totally committed to struggling against racism and sexism in all their forms. That was and continues to be very important to me. It would be pure fantasy to think that all the ills, such as racism, classism or sexism, could be dealt with in 30 years. But what is realistic is that it is much easier and much more possible to struggle against those ills in a country which is dedicated to social justice and to eliminating injustice.” Isaac Saney cites a very moving and revealing anecdote recounted by an elderly black man in Cuba: “I was travelling on a very crowded bus. At a bus stop, where many people got off, a black man got a seat. A middle aged woman said in a very loud and irritated voice: ‘And it had to be a black who gets the seat.’ The response of the people on the bus was incredible. People began to criticize the woman, telling her that a revolution was fought to get rid of those stupid ideas; that the black man should be viewed as having the same rights as she had – including a seat on a crowded bus. The discussion and criticism became loud and animated. The bus driver was asked to stop the bus because the people engaging in the criticism had decided that the woman expressing racist attitudes must get off the bus. For the rest of my trip, the people apologized to the black comrade and talked about where such racist attitudes come from and what must be done to get rid of them.” https://prolecenter.wordpress.com/2013/07/26/20-reasons-to-support-cuba/

Cuban woman rights record (ranked 6th in the world for women political participation): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women%27s_rights_in_Cuba

Cuba Number 1 for Sustainable Development: WWF: https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/As-World-Burns-Cuba-Number-1-For-Sustainable-Development-W...

From Leo Humberman and Paul Sweezy's "Cuba anatomy of a revolution: . In 2015, about 95% of Cubans had access to an improved water source (96% of the urban population, but only 92% of the rural population). Cuba's access to adequate sanitation is the second-highest in Latin America and the Caribbean after Uruguay: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_supply_and_sanitation_in_Cuba#Access

There may be a bit of a discrepancy here about the electricity. Rural areas in Cuba before 1959 only had ranging 5.8% to 9.1%, according to sources (7% average). But average homes overall were about 50%:

In 1959, only about 50% of households in the island nation had access to electricity. By 1989, the electric grid provided service to 95% of household. https://www.edf.org/sites/default/files/cuban-electric-grid.pdf

Ironically, the electricity before the revolution was ran by an American-owned electric power company, and was riddled with corruption (from the same book from above): https://i.imgur.com/KG08tKh.png

For hunger and poverty:

Over the last 50 years, comprehensive social protection programmes have largely eradicated poverty and hunger. Food-based social safety nets include a monthly food basket for the entire population, school feeding programmes, and mother-and-child health care programmes. Although effective, these programmes mostly rely on food imports and strain the national budget. In 2011, in the context of efforts to make the economy more efficient, the government announced plans to make social protection more sustainable and streamlined, with an emphasis on the most vulnerable groups along “no one left behind” lines. http://www1.wfp.org/countries/cuba

First country to develop Lung cancer, meningitus vaccines and HIV mother-to-child prevention: https://elpais.com/elpais/2017/02/10/inenglish/1486729823_171276.html

Free training for international students: https://www.wired.com/2016/03/students-ditching-america-medical-school-cuba/

Cuba is the largest and most populated island in the Caribbean yet consistently experiences the lowest death tolls during hurricane season.[5] According to United Nations, it's not because Cubans are lucky but because they're prepared.[6] According to Oxfam, from 1996 to 2002, only 16 people were killed by the six hurricanes that struck Cuba.[7]

Cuba's meteorological institute has 15 provincial offices.[citation needed] They share data with US scientists and project storm tracks. Around 72 hours before a storm's predicted landfall, national media issue alerts while civil protection committees check evacuation plans and shelters. Hurricane awareness is taught in schools and there are practice drills for the public before each hurricane season.[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuba_emergency_response_system

Operation Miracle (A third of Cuba's 75,000 doctors, along with 10,000 other health workers, are currently working in 77 poor countries, including El Salvador, Mali and East Timor. This still leaves one doctor for every 220 people at home, one of the highest ratios in the world, compared with one for every 370 in England.): https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/cuban-medics-in-haiti-pu...

And Haiti: https://www.counterpunch.org/2010/04/01/cuban-medical-aid-to-haiti/

Took me a while to get these source, so enjoy!

I don't want to be a jerk because I'm all for Cuba, but is there a source other than another redditor for any of these facts?

That looks like a lot of work. Thanks, it will be a lot more convincing now!

Racism, which used to be a huge problem has been virtually wiped out

Yeah this isn't true at all, police brutality is still a huge issue in Cuba and the people protesting it are primarily African-descended Cubans. Protestors and activists get repressed by the state. African-descended Cubans were vastly underrepresented in all processes in the state until very recently and still are in bureaucracy.

How can “racism be virtually abolished” when whites still control more economic and political power and with every step towards privatization and introduction of market forces there are more and more racial inequality? In majority African country only white Presidents have been in power. Anti-racist activists in Cuba like Gisela Arandia have presented documents about racism in Cuba, and about how official state periodicals support it. One source

Women's rights are upheld and promoted

But not all LGBT rights such as in the discriminatory 2013 labor law that Mariela Castro bravely voted against defying the Party.

Cuba doesn't need to be perfect, or even socialist to be defended.

BREAKING: Massive Strike in CA Right Now (via DSA)

BREAKING: Massive Strike in CA Right Now (via DSA)

Good news wish i was closer so i could help support the strike more.

MRA - Acronym for Mens Rights Activist.

Ohhhh here we go!

I mean the rate is 10% lower than other countries like Sweden once federal taxes are added. just because they tax the rich more than others doesn't mean it is necessarily enough.

FREE PUERTO RICO! Their May Day Protests Should Not Go Unheard!

FREE PUERTO RICO! Their May Day Protests Should Not Go Unheard!

We intervene in Syrian conflicts we don't have clear information about, halfway across the world in the Middle East. We ignore a U.S. territory 1/10th of that distance away, when it actually asks for the help we are truly resposible for.

Our administration failed you Puerto Rico. I wouldn't trust our leaders with responsibility over a student council.

What the fuck are those cops thinking? Can they not see that they're on the wrong side of this moral equation?

Cops don't think, cops don't have morals, they are hired especially for these traits.

What Puerto Rico should do is this: issue an ultimatum. "Either admit us as a full-fledged state and give us the aid we need or we will declare independence--and we'll immediately ask for China to give us the aid we need. You have one week." Of course, the US Military could invade in full, but since PR has the right to declare independence, would they?

Jordan Peterson | ContraPoints

Jordan Peterson | ContraPoints

he says Marxists are non-human, he'll parrot buzzwords like 'cultural marxism' which is straight from nazi propaganda. the guy is a useful muppet for fascists at best.

Very funny. I really appreciate her perspective. Jordan Peterson might not be a fascist, but he is a neo-liberal enabler of the alt-right.

the guy is a useful muppet for fascists at best.

liberals_irl

love contra

Onwards towards the revolution! Mayday from the syndicalist march in Stockholm

Onwards towards the revolution! Mayday from the syndicalist march in Stockholm

It’s the royal palace

What's that building in the background? It's beautiful

Try one of these subthreads