ColorizedHistory

Capt. George Malcolm Ashmun - US. Marine Corps - VFW-214 Black Sheep Squadron (Posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism. He was shot down over Rabaul on 3 Jan 1944)

Capt. George Malcolm Ashmun - US. Marine Corps - VFW-214 Black Sheep Squadron (Posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism. He was shot down over Rabaul on 3 Jan 1944)

Isn't this like the perfect Character for Brad Pitt?

Holy shit if that ain't Brad Pitt, I'm finding it hard to believe it's not.

Brad Pitt meets Steph Curry

I don't think anyone else has noticed or mentioned this, but he totally looks like Brad Pitt

The as-yet unknown Robin Williams in Central Park, 1974.

The as-yet unknown Robin Williams in Central Park, 1974.

"In 1974, 22-year-old Daniel Sorine trained his camera on two mime artists performing in New York’s Central Park. In 2013, Daniel was looking through his negatives and photographs when he realised one of the mimes was Oscar winning actor Robin Williams"- flashbak.com

Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014)

"American actor and comedian. Born in Chicago, Williams started as a stand-up comedian in San Francisco and Los Angeles in the mid-1970s. He is credited with leading San Francisco's comedy renaissance. After rising to fame playing an alien named Mork in the TV sci-fi sitcom series Mork & Mindy, Williams established a career in both stand-up comedy and feature film acting. He was known for his improvisational skills." - wikipedia

Be Happy

Died 4 years ago? Fuck.

Was watching some clips of him recently. Never knew he made an appearance in the video clip, and loved this tribute. Rollercoaster of emotions.

The “Mork & Mindy” suspenders! 🌈 😍

original

Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin

Beautiful woman and singer. She had a voice for soul like no one else.

Aretha Louise Franklin (March 25, 1942 – August 16, 2018) was an American singer and songwriter. Franklin began her career as a child singing gospel at New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, where her father, C. L. Franklin, was minister. In 1960, at the age of 18, she embarked on a secular career, recording for Columbia Records but only achieving modest success. Following her signing to Atlantic Records in 1967, Franklin achieved commercial acclaim and success with songs such as "Respect", "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman", "Spanish Harlem" and "Think". By the end of the 1960s she had gained the title "The Queen of Soul".

Franklin eventually recorded a total of 112 charted singles on Billboard, including 77 Hot 100 entries, 17 top ten pop singles, 100 R&B entries and 20 number-one R&B singles, becoming the most charted female artist in the chart's history.

Franklin also recorded acclaimed albums such as I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You, Lady Soul, Young, Gifted and Black and Amazing Grace before experiencing problems with her record company by the mid-1970s. After her father was shot in 1979, Franklin left Atlantic and signed with Arista Records, finding success with her part in the 1980 film The Blues Brothers and with the albums Jump to It (1982) and Who's Zoomin' Who? (1985).

In 1998, Franklin won international acclaim for singing the opera aria "Nessun dorma", at the Grammys of that year replacing Luciano Pavarotti. Later that same year, she scored her final Top 40 recording with "A Rose Is Still a Rose".

Franklin's other popular and well known hits include "Rock Steady", "Jump to It", "Freeway of Love", "Who's Zoomin' Who", "Chain Of Fools", "Until You Come Back to Me (That's What I'm Gonna Do)", "Something He Can Feel", "I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)" (with George Michael), and a remake of The Rolling Stones song "Jumpin' Jack Flash".

Franklin has won a total of 18 Grammy Awards and is one of the best-selling musical artists of all time, having sold over 75 million records worldwide.

Franklin has been honored throughout her career including a 1987 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in which she became the first female performer to be inducted. She was inducted to the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. In August 2012, Franklin was inducted into the GMA Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

Franklin is listed in at least two all-time lists on Rolling Stone magazine, including the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, and the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time. She died at home today from complications of pancreatic cancer. - Wiki

A true queen. We're all deeply saddened today...

Even among the highly talented- the prodigies, the virtuosos -even among the best only a few have magic.

Orville Wright flying a glider over the dunes of North Carolina, 1902.

Orville Wright flying a glider over the dunes of North Carolina, 1902.

And just a little over 40 years later we started dropping nukes with these things. What a fast progression aviation took.

Nice colorization! However, I don't think this photo is from 1902. The 1902 glider was a canard design, and the pilot laid prone on the lower wing. This appears to be the 1911 design, which had a now-conventional tailplane, with the pilot sitting upright.

Add another 20 and we got men exploring celestial bodies.

Another 50 years later and we have Spirit.

Wait..

ATS spotters, wearing sunglasses, watch for any sign of hostile aircraft at a London anti-aircraft battery. In front of them is a range-finder. September 1940

ATS spotters, wearing sunglasses, watch for any sign of hostile aircraft at a London anti-aircraft battery. In front of them is a range-finder. September 1940

Pull the lever Kronk!

This is so cool. My Nana was in the ATS. Never seen a photo of them in action.

Are those binoculars for hammerhead sharks?

Most uniforms of the time were woolen. However, all woolen uniforms had a cotton liner of some kind so they’re not as itchy as you might think (or in the case of an american M1941 field jacket, twill shell and wool lining). Almost always your service shirt that is worn underneath is also made from a knit wool flannel, those actually aren’t itchy. Underneath that would be a cotton undershirt of some type. It’s definitely a warm setup, but not as itchy as it looks.

Source: have worn original and reproduction US uniforms from WWI and WWII. The same thing carries over to British and uniforms.

A pair of M-8 'Greyhound' Armored Cars of 'C' Company, 82nd Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd US Armored Division, turn from Rue de Vire into Rue de la Forêt, Saint-Sever-Calvados, Normandy. 3 August 1944

A pair of M-8 'Greyhound' Armored Cars of 'C' Company, 82nd Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd US Armored Division, turn from Rue de Vire into Rue de la Forêt, Saint-Sever-Calvados, Normandy. 3 August 1944

Folks there still leaving their rubbish lying about. https://www.google.com/maps/@48.8398248,-1.0473651,3a,75y,350.22h,90.92t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s_85Fn59hRIWfkoAoxWXWdg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

A pair of M-8 'Greyhound' Armored Cars of 'C' Company, 82nd Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd US Armored Division, turn from Rue de Vire into Rue de la Forêt, Saint-Sever-Calvados, Normandy. 3 August 1944

A GI (probably a member of the crew) walks alongside. The second M-8 is named "Conan" by its crew, with C-32 as its unit designation. C-31 takes the lead. On the rear deck of "Conan" can be seen an air recognition panel used to identify the vehicle to Allied aircraft. The colours were changed on a pre-determined schedule to ensure the Germans could not use them.

The battalion mainly used the M-8 Light Armored Car, as it was fast, up to 56 mph (90 km/h), and gave some protection from small arms fire. M-8 was equipped with a 37 mm gun and 6X6 wheel drive. The M-8 was the main reconnaissance vehicle used by the US military in WW2. Also used was the M-20 scout car, which was a M-8 without the 37 mm gun and turret. In its place was an anti-aircraft ring mount for a .50-caliber machine gun. A bazooka was provided for the crew to compensate for its lack of anti-armor weaponry. 

With these vehicles, the 82nd could scout ahead of the slower M-4 Sherman tank with a top speed of 25 mph to 30 mph. Also used for reconnaissance and to run messages, Harley-Davidson WLA motorcycles were used by the 82nd as well. Almost all units used Jeeps as they were fast four-wheel drive utility vehicles.

The 82nd was a part of Combat Command A, 2nd US Armored Division.

Colour by RJM

Gotta feel for the guy who's walking while everyone else gets to ride in the armoured cars

Wow, that's awesome thanks for finding that.

Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953)

Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953)

The last president to ever be elected without going to college.

Truman was pretty amazing. He went from being a nobody in his thirties, to a president in his sixties. How does an average chap go from two failed businesses, no political career, to deciding to use the most destructive bomb in history?

The recent Art Of Manliness podcast about him is great.

I never knew that, how utterly alien it is to us to comprehend electing officials that haven’t been to university.

There's no "." after the "S" Truman spelled it that way, which I always found interesting.

The Hindenburg disaster, May 6, 1937.

The Hindenburg disaster, May 6, 1937.

Oh, the humanity! How long did coloring this take?

You are very good at this

2-3 hours.

This photo is from my book The Colour of Time, - made in collaboration with historian Dan Jones, which will be out next week. Please consider pre-ordering it if you can. There are 199 other photos in there, all accompanied by Dan's brilliant narrative. If you have interest, here's the first official review. Thank you so much!

The Hindenburg disaster occurred on May 6, 1937, in Manchester Township, New Jersey, United States. The German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg caught fire and was destroyed during its attempt to dock with its mooring mast at Naval Air Station Lakehurst.

Despite the sheer ferocity of the colossal fire, many of the crew members and passengers survived, but the majority of them were severely burned. Of the 36 passengers and 61 crewmen, 13 passengers and 22 aircrewmen died. Also killed was one ground crewman, the civilian linesman Allen Hagaman. Ten passengers and 16 crewmen died in the crash or in the fire. The majority of the victims were burnt to death, while others died jumping from the airship at an excessive height, or as a consequence of either smoke inhalation or falling debris. Six other crewmembers, three passengers and Allen Hagaman died in the following hours or days, mostly as a consequence of the burns.

The majority of the crewmen who died were up inside the ship's hull, where they either did not have a clear escape route or else were close to the bow of the ship, which hung burning in the air for too long for most of them to escape death. Most of the crew in the bow died in the fire, although at least one was filmed falling from the bow to his death. Most of the passengers who died were trapped in the starboard side of the passenger deck. Not only was the wind blowing the fire toward the starboard side, but the ship also rolled slightly to starboard as it settled to the ground, with much of the upper hull on that part of the ship collapsing outboard of the starboard observation windows, thus cutting off the escape of many of the passengers on that side. To make matters worse, the sliding door leading from the starboard passenger area to the central foyer and the gangway stairs (through which rescuers led a number of passengers to safety) jammed shut during the crash, further trapping those passengers on the starboard side. Nonetheless, some did manage to escape from the starboard passenger decks. By contrast, all but a few of the passengers on the port side of the ship survived the fire, with some of them escaping virtually unscathed. Although the most famous airship disaster, it was not the worst. Just over twice as many (73 of 76 on board) had perished when the helium-filled U.S. Navy scout airship USS Akron crashed at sea off the New Jersey coast four years earlier on April 4, 1933.

Some of the survivors were saved by luck. Werner Franz, the 14-year-old cabin boy, was initially dazed by the realization that the ship was on fire. As he stood near the officer's mess where he had been putting away dishes moments before, a water tank above him burst open, and he was suddenly soaked. This snapped him back to his senses, as he later told interviewers, and also put out the fire around him. He then made his way to a nearby hatch through which the kitchen had been loaded with provisions before the flight, and dropped through it just as the forward part of the ship was briefly rebounding into the air. He began to run toward the starboard side, but stopped and turned around and ran the other way, because the flames were being pushed by the wind in that direction. He made it clear of the wreck with no injuries, and was the last surviving crew member when he died at the age of 92 on August 13, 2014. The last surviving passenger is Werner G. Doehner (b. 1928), a retired electrical engineer who was an eight-year-old child traveling with his parents, brother, and sister at the time of the accident. His father and sister died in the disaster.

When the control car crashed onto the ground, most of the officers leapt through the windows, but became separated. First Officer Captain Albert Sammt found Captain Max Pruss trying to re-enter the wreckage to look for survivors. Pruss's face was badly burned, and he required months of hospitalization and reconstructive surgery, but he survived. Captain Ernst Lehmann escaped the crash with burns to his head and arms and severe burns across most of his back. He died at a nearby hospital the next day.

When passenger Joseph Späh, a vaudeville comic acrobat, saw the first sign of trouble he smashed the window with his movie camera with which he had been filming the landing (the film survived the disaster). As the ship neared the ground he lowered himself out the window and hung onto the window ledge, letting go when the ship was perhaps 20 feet above the ground. His acrobat's instincts kicked in, and Späh kept his feet under him and attempted to do a safety roll when he landed. He injured his ankle nonetheless, and was dazedly crawling away when a member of the ground crew came up, slung the diminutive Späh under one arm, and ran him clear of the fire.

Of the 12 crewmen in the bow of the airship, only three survived. Four of these 12 men were standing on the mooring shelf, a platform up at the very tip of the bow from which the forwardmost landing ropes and the steel mooring cable were released to the ground crew, and which was directly at the forward end of the axial walkway and just ahead of gas cell #16. The rest were standing either along the lower keel walkway ahead of the control car, or else on platforms beside the stairway leading up the curve of the bow to the mooring shelf. During the fire the bow hung in the air at roughly a 45-degree angle and flames shot forward through the axial walkway, bursting through the bow (and the bow gas cells) like a blowtorch. The three men from the forward section who survived (elevatorman Kurt Bauer, cook Alfred Grözinger, and electrician Josef Leibrecht) were those furthest aft of the bow, and two of them (Bauer and Grözinger) happened to be standing near two large triangular air vents, through which cool air was being drawn by the fire. Neither of these men sustained more than superficial burns. Most of the men standing along the bow stairway either fell aft into the fire, or tried to leap from the ship when it was still too high in the air. Three of the four men standing on the mooring shelf inside the very tip of the bow were actually taken from the wreck alive, though one (Erich Spehl, a rigger) died shortly afterwards in the Air Station's infirmary, and the other two (helmsman Alfred Bernhard and apprentice elevatorman Ludwig Felber) were reported by newspapers to have initially survived the fire, and then to subsequently have died at area hospitals during the night or early the following morning.

Hydrogen fires are notable for being less destructive to immediate surroundings than gasoline explosions because of the buoyancy of H2, which causes heat of combustion to be released upwards more than circumferentially as the leaked mass ascends in the atmosphere; hydrogen fires are more survivable than fires of gasoline or wood. The hydrogen in the Hindenburg burned out within about 90 seconds.

The disaster was the subject of spectacular newsreel coverage, photographs, and Herbert Morrison's recorded radio eyewitness reports from the landing field, which were broadcast the next day. A variety of hypotheses have been put forward for both the cause of ignition and the initial fuel for the ensuing fire. The event shattered public confidence in the giant, passenger-carrying rigid airship and marked the abrupt end of the airship era. Source

Richard Davis "Dick" Winters - Officer of the United States Army and a decorated war veteran. He is best known for commanding Easy Company of the 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, part of the 101st Airborne Division, during World War II.

Richard Davis "Dick" Winters - Officer of the United States Army and a decorated war veteran. He is best known for commanding Easy Company of the 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, part of the 101st Airborne Division, during World War II.

Watching Band of Brothers right now. What an incredible show, and the way they portray Winters makes him out to be an extraordinary man.

The way his men talk about him speaks volumes to his character

Excerpt of Interview with Dick Winters

“Grandpa, where you a hero in the war?”

It’s not just the fact that these young men risked their lives in support and defense of their country. But it’s the humility, loyalty, and grace by which they display it makes it so incredibly beautiful and moving. They didn’t want accolades or demand parades for what they deemed was simply their “duty”. The Greatest Generation indeed.

SPIERS GET YOURSELF OVER HERE!!

Edward Sheriff Curtis (February 16, 1868 – October 19, 1952) was an American photographer and ethnologist whose work focused on the American West and on Native American peoples.

Edward Sheriff Curtis (February 16, 1868 – October 19, 1952) was an American photographer and ethnologist whose work focused on the American West and on Native American peoples.

Anyone else think this was Van Pelt from Jumanji?

He was really a handsome guy.

Edward Sheriff Curtis (February 16, 1868 – October 19, 1952) was an American Photographer and ethnologist whose work focused on the American West and on Native American peoples.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/edward-curtis-epic-project-to-photograph-native-americans-...

The Harriman Alaska Expedition of 1899 sounds AMAZING. (Edward Curtis taking photos, people like John Muir were part of the party) "his party grew to include some of the country's foremost and distinguished scientific personnel, artists, photographers, writers, and conservationists."

Harriman Alaska Expedition notes/photos: http://content.lib.washington.edu/harrimanweb/index.html

Try one of these subthreads