spaceporn

Meteor Explodes Over Michigan - 1/16/2018

Imagine if something like this coincidentally coincided with the false ballistic missile alert.

NASA: Meteorites 'likely' on ground in southeast Michigan

That article also has an awesome video posted by Nasa Meteor Watch.

The meteor caused a 2.0 magnitude earthquake.

Take an upvote for "coincidentally coincided"

It shook our building a bit.

The debris isn’t far from where we live. Time to go hunting for meteorites.

International Space Station is seen against the Sun, near the edge of the Moon's shadow during the solar eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017 [2182 × 1073]

International Space Station is seen against the Sun, near the edge of the Moon's shadow during th...

Quite the combo there. Kudos to the photographer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lepQoU4oek4

Not the source of this photo, but another great set of shots like this, plus all the details of how it was done:

And everyone laughed when they said they'd land on the sun at night. Sure proved us wrong.

Thanks for linking this. I love Destin’s excitement

Earth from Apollo 11 [5700x5700]

Earth from Apollo 11 [5700x5700]

That doesn't look flat what the hell lol

I always forget how massive Africa is. This really puts it into perspective.

I mean sure it was a huge hit, but I believe Toto is overrated.

I know it's a joke/running gag, but can we please stop feeding these flatheaded idiots?

Final composite image of Saturn taken by the Cassini spacecraft before it crashed into the planet's atmosphere. [4269 × 2384]

Final composite image of Saturn taken by the Cassini spacecraft before it crashed into the planet's atmosphere. [4269 × 2384]

Is it strange that all I think of when I see things like this is "this is something I'll never see with my naked eyes", which makes me very sad.

Not with that attitude.

not with that altitude

For those curious, THIS is Cassini's actual last image (thats not a composite)

For those curious, is Cassini's actual last image (thats not a composite)

High-res image of the moon showing off its thousands of impact craters [1280 x 1280]

High-res image of the moon showing off its thousands of impact craters [1280 x 1280]

Well, considering my source is the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Flickr account, I'd be hard-pressed to claim ownership. ;)

I'm really curious about how would a person or a car or a pyramid look like on the surface on this photo just to get an idea of the size of the moon.

Some of those features don't seem familiar to me, so this has to be a picture of a portion of the far side of the Moon right?

It's a NASA pic and I can't find the details on equipment used.

The Earth from Saturn [1440 x 1080]

The Earth from Saturn [1440 x 1080]

Anyone else notice that really spooky arrow beneath Earth?

I heard something mysterious was supposed to collide with the earth on September 23, 2017. I thought it was debunked, but maybe this is what ends it all!

"Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives." - Carl Sagan

Planet with Life Found from Space

Milky Way over Mount Fuji. [2560 x 1600]

Milky Way over Mount Fuji. [2560 x 1600]
Totally fake, has been making the rounds on the net for years. Original sky shot was taken by Dave Morrow at Mt. Rainier: https://cdn.davemorrowphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Mount-Rainier-Star-Photography-Workshops-and-Tours-Header-900x394.jpg

Totally fake, has been making the rounds on the net for years. Original sky shot was taken by Dave Morrow at Mt. Rainier:

The stars are all fake, how could this happen again, it's snowing on Mt. Fuji.

Thanks, I wondered how they got the photo despite the massive light pollution. This article tells how difficult it would be to get a shot like this: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/z43394/you-can-only-see-the-milky-way-over-mount-fuji-...

Came here for this

A little late to the eclipse game, but I thought I'd toss this out there in case anyone was still riding out that wave. Taken from Bone, ID, Population: 2. [OC][4920x3496]

A little late to the eclipse game, but I thought I'd toss this out there in case anyone was still riding out that wave. Taken from Bone, ID, Population: 2. [OC][4920x3496]

Are you one of the two residents?

I'm not! But it was sure better being there during the eclipse than in one of those insane areas with hundreds of thousands of people. Felt like we had the eclipse all to ourselves.

Technically it's an unincorporated territory--so it's essentially one step below a town.

Shouldn't be a problem for you though, I imagine you've been living your life one step short of Bone town for a while. ;)

Nice shot man. Unique as far as I've seen.

My take on the Great American Solar Eclipse [OC] [2705x800]

My take on the Great American Solar Eclipse [OC] [2705x800]

Zoom in to see sunspots and Venus. Taken in Riverton, Wyoming.

We have the best solar eclipses. Don't we, folks?

I know that he meant "the solar eclipse as seen from America" by his title but it sure does sound like dumb patriotism.

It's funny that a solar eclipse anywhere in the world is "just" a magnificent event, but if it visible in North America it become the "Great American Solar Eclipse"! Really great shoots tho!

Aurora above Planet Earth, photographed from the International Space Station by NASA Astronaut Jack D. Fischer on 26 June 2017. [4928 x 3280] [OS]

Aurora above Planet Earth, photographed from the International Space Station by NASA Astronaut Jack D. Fischer on 26 June 2017. [4928 x 3280] [OS]

The rest of the world, my American friend.

Blows my mind every time


Source: https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/watching-the-aurora-from-orbit
Milky Way Galaxy reference map in 6000 x 3887 pixels: https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3787/12541070883_0a7f64ef52_o.jpg

Via: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mrdanbeaumont/12541070883/sizes/o/
Aurora Australis over the Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean photographed from the International Space Station: http://chamorrobible.org/gpw/gpw-201311.htm
Aurora Borealis above Alaska, United States of America (USA), on 18 January 2005: 3008 x 1960 pixels

Via: #1 at http://chamorrobible.org/gpw/gpw-20050129.htm
". . . 'The satellites have found evidence of magnetic ropes connecting Earth's upper atmosphere directly to the sun,' said David Sibeck, project scientist for the mission at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. 'We believe that solar wind particles flow in along these ropes, providing energy for geomagnetic storms and auroras.'

A magnetic rope is a twisted bundle of magnetic fields organized much like the twisted hemp of a mariner's rope. Spacecraft have detected hints of these ropes before, but a single spacecraft was insufficient to map their 3D structure. THEMIS' five identical micro-satellites were able to perform the feat.

'THEMIS encountered its first magnetic rope on May 20,' said Sibeck. 'It was very large, about as wide as Earth, and located approximately 40,000 miles (70,000 km) above Earth's surface in a region called the magnetopause.' The magnetopause is where the solar wind and Earth's magnetic field meet and push against one another like sumo wrestlers locked in combat. There, the rope formed and unraveled in just a few minutes, providing a brief but significant conduit for solar wind energy. . . ."

Via: "NASA - NASA Spacecraft Make New Discoveries About Northern Lights" by Cynthia O'Carroll, published on 11 December 2007, available at http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/themis/auroras/northern_lights.html
(a) "Space scientists at UCLA solve the mystery behind aurora borealis" by Stuart Wolpert, published on 24 July 2008: http://www.newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/scientists-solve-30-year-old-aurora-53738.aspx

(b) "THEMIS Satellites Discover What Triggers Eruptions of the Northern Lights" by Laura Layton, published on 24 July 2008: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/themis/auroras/themis_power.html

(c) "Tail Reconnection Triggering Substorm Onset" by Vassilis Angelopoulos, James P. McFadden, Davin Larson, Charles W. Carlson, Stephen B. Mende, Harald Frey, Tai Phan, David G. Sibeck, Karl-Heinz Glassmeier, Uli Auster, Eric Donovan, Ian R. Mann, I. Jonathan Rae, Christopher T. Russell, Andrei Runov, Xu-Zhi Zhou, and Larry Kepko: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/321/5891/931.abstract

PDF: http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/public/journal-club/2008.09-12.(Sep-Dec).Journal.Club.Papers/2008.10.01.Journal.Club.Papers/Angelopoulos.et.al.Science.2008.Tail%20Reconnection%20Triggering%20Substorm%20Onset.pdf

See also: http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/public/vassilis/1160495_revised_20080621/1160495_paper.pdf
"Space Storms: Expert Q&A" by NOVA scienceNOW, "On July 22, 2008, physicist Vassilis Angelopoulos answered selected viewer questions about the THEMIS mission, for which he is Principal Investigator, as well as general questions about the aurora and magnetosphere", published on 22 July 2008: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/angelopoulos-auroras.html
"Direct observation of closed magnetic flux trapped in the high-latitude magnetosphere" by R. C. Fear, S. E. Milan, R. Maggiolo, A. N. Fazakerley, I. Dandouras, and S. B. Mende: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6216/1506

PDF: https://scholar.uib.no/sites/default/files/birkeland/files/49_science-2014-fear-1506-101.pdf

- "Origin of high-latitude auroras revealed" by European Space Agency (ESA), published on 18 December 2014: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Cluster/Origin_of_high-latitude_auroras_revealed

- "Origin of polar auroras revealed" by University College London, published on 19 December 2014: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1214/191214-aurora
"The wildfires glow underneath The Northern Lights, also known as the Aurora Borealis, near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, May 7, 2016.": http://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BBsKlpm.img 

Mirror: https://web.archive.org/web/20160508010722/img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BBsKlpm.img

Photo credit: Mark Blinch / Reuters

Via: "Photos: Wildfire devastates Fort McMurray" by MSN.com, published on 7 May 2016 at http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/alberta-fires/photos-wildfire-devastates-fort-mcmurray/ss-BBsDnTl and http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/alberta-fires/photos-wildfire-devastates-fort-mcmurray/ss-BBsDnTl?fullscreen=true#image=1

Source: https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/watching-the-aurora-from-orbit

Milky Way Galaxy reference map in 6000 x 3887 pixels:

Via: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mrdanbeaumont/12541070883/sizes/o/

Aurora Australis over the Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean photographed from the International Space Station: http://chamorrobible.org/gpw/gpw-201311.htm

Aurora Borealis above Alaska, United States of America (USA), on 18 January 2005: 3008 x 1960 pixels

Via: #1 at http://chamorrobible.org/gpw/gpw-20050129.htm

". . . 'The satellites have found evidence of magnetic ropes connecting Earth's upper atmosphere directly to the sun,' said David Sibeck, project scientist for the mission at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. 'We believe that solar wind particles flow in along these ropes, providing energy for geomagnetic storms and auroras.'

A magnetic rope is a twisted bundle of magnetic fields organized much like the twisted hemp of a mariner's rope. Spacecraft have detected hints of these ropes before, but a single spacecraft was insufficient to map their 3D structure. THEMIS' five identical micro-satellites were able to perform the feat.

'THEMIS encountered its first magnetic rope on May 20,' said Sibeck. 'It was very large, about as wide as Earth, and located approximately 40,000 miles (70,000 km) above Earth's surface in a region called the magnetopause.' The magnetopause is where the solar wind and Earth's magnetic field meet and push against one another like sumo wrestlers locked in combat. There, the rope formed and unraveled in just a few minutes, providing a brief but significant conduit for solar wind energy. . . ."

Via: "NASA - NASA Spacecraft Make New Discoveries About Northern Lights" by Cynthia O'Carroll, published on 11 December 2007, available at http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/themis/auroras/northern_lights.html

(a) "Space scientists at UCLA solve the mystery behind aurora borealis" by Stuart Wolpert, published on 24 July 2008: http://www.newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/scientists-solve-30-year-old-aurora-53738.aspx

(b) "THEMIS Satellites Discover What Triggers Eruptions of the Northern Lights" by Laura Layton, published on 24 July 2008: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/themis/auroras/themis_power.html

(c) "Tail Reconnection Triggering Substorm Onset" by Vassilis Angelopoulos, James P. McFadden, Davin Larson, Charles W. Carlson, Stephen B. Mende, Harald Frey, Tai Phan, David G. Sibeck, Karl-Heinz Glassmeier, Uli Auster, Eric Donovan, Ian R. Mann, I. Jonathan Rae, Christopher T. Russell, Andrei Runov, Xu-Zhi Zhou, and Larry Kepko: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/321/5891/931.abstract

PDF: http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/public/journal-club/2008.09-12.(Sep-Dec).Journal.Club.Papers/2008.10.01.Journal.Club.Papers/Angelopoulos.et.al.Science.2008.Tail%20Reconnection%20Triggering%20Substorm%20Onset.pdf

See also: http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/public/vassilis/1160495_revised_20080621/1160495_paper.pdf

"Space Storms: Expert Q&A" by NOVA scienceNOW, "On July 22, 2008, physicist Vassilis Angelopoulos answered selected viewer questions about the THEMIS mission, for which he is Principal Investigator, as well as general questions about the aurora and magnetosphere", published on 22 July 2008: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/angelopoulos-auroras.html

"Direct observation of closed magnetic flux trapped in the high-latitude magnetosphere" by R. C. Fear, S. E. Milan, R. Maggiolo, A. N. Fazakerley, I. Dandouras, and S. B. Mende: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6216/1506

PDF: https://scholar.uib.no/sites/default/files/birkeland/files/49_science-2014-fear-1506-101.pdf

- "Origin of high-latitude auroras revealed" by European Space Agency (ESA), published on 18 December 2014: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Cluster/Origin_of_high-latitude_auroras_revealed

- "Origin of polar auroras revealed" by University College London, published on 19 December 2014: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1214/191214-aurora

"The wildfires glow underneath The Northern Lights, also known as the Aurora Borealis, near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, May 7, 2016.": http://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BBsKlpm.img

Mirror: https://web.archive.org/web/20160508010722/img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BBsKlp...

Photo credit: Mark Blinch / Reuters

Via: "Photos: Wildfire devastates Fort McMurray" by MSN.com, published on 7 May 2016 at http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/alberta-fires/photos-wildfire-devastates-fort-mcmurray/ss-BBsDnTl and http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/alberta-fires/photos-wildfire-devastates-fort-mcmurray/ss-BBsDnTl?f...

The Aurora is beautiful, but I can't help myself feeling drawn to the stars in the top. The vast emptiness of it all blows my mind every time I take time to really look at photos like this. I think having the earth, moon, or something familiar in frame helps to really provide perspective to the degree of emptiness, while at the same time adding a sort of comfort. Without these familiar bodies, I think it would feel so terrifyingly empty up there.

Try one of these subthreads