silentmoviegifs

Charlie Chaplin hangs up his hat in One A.M. (1916)

Great silent short, showing off his fantastic ‘drunk guy’ bit. No one can do ‘drunk guy’ like him.

Playing drunks is one of the things that helped make Chaplin so famous as a stage performer.

Meanwhile, Sydney Chaplin had joined Fred Karno's prestigious comedy company in 1906 and, by 1908, he was one of their key performers.[46] In February, he managed to secure a two-week trial for his younger brother. Karno was initially wary, and considered Chaplin a "pale, puny, sullen-looking youngster" who "looked much too shy to do any good in the theatre."[47] However, the teenager made an impact on his first night at the London Coliseum and he was quickly signed to a contract.[48] Chaplin began by playing a series of minor parts, eventually progressing to starring roles in 1909.[49] In April 1910, he was given the lead in a new sketch, Jimmy the Fearless. It was a big success, and Chaplin received considerable press attention.[50]

Karno selected his new star to join the section of the company, one that also included Stan Laurel, that toured North America's vaudeville circuit.[51] The young comedian headed the show and impressed reviewers, being described as "one of the best pantomime artists ever seen here".[52] His most successful role was a drunk called the "Inebriate Swell", which drew him significant recognition.[53] The tour lasted 21 months, and the troupe returned to England in June 1912.[54] Chaplin recalled that he "had a disquieting feeling of sinking back into a depressing commonplaceness" and was, therefore, delighted when a new tour began in October.[55]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Chaplin#Stage_comedy_and_vaudeville

I’ve never thought of Chaplin as necessarily attractive, but this clip is sexy AF. Guess I’m attracted to fake drunk Chaplin.

Harold Lloyd plays a prank on a police officer in Safety Last! (1923)

That is hilarious! Is this public domain, meaning is there somewhere I can watch this free? What was with the white face paint? Was it for contrast since it's black and white?

Safety Last will actually enter the public domain in the U.S. on January 1 of next year, along with every other movie released in 1923 that wasn't already in the public domain. It is available to watch free online in various version, but I'd recommend the Criterion version if you can find it (probably a lot of public libraries would have it).

Criterion did a nice job cleaning up the print, and adding a new musical score etc, and there are some great extras including a three-part documentary about Harold Lloyd.

As to the whiteness of the faces, they were probably wearing some kind of makeup, but nowhere near as much as silent comics wore in the 1910s when film quality wasn't as good as it was by the 1920s. (The freckle-faced kid, Mickey Daniels, clearly isn't really wearing that much makeup. He was one of the original Little Rascals). It could also just be a result of me taking the movie and making it into a 256 colour GIF, which doesn't really capture the exact look of the movie on film.

It's on Youtube.

hanging from a clock

The iconic scene from this is the stunt that ends with him . You've likely seen that referenced before. However the full film is definitely worth watching. There are some racist punchlines but otherwise all the jokes still play really well.

Buster Keaton trailing a suspect in Sherlock Jr. (1924)

Catching a lit cig off a no look throw? Dude perfect aint got shit on Buster Keaton.

i mean he's pretty universally considered a giant of film and the best person in history at physical comedy...

He deserves more credit than he gets.

Stanley Kubrick on Charlie Chaplin: “If something is really happening on the screen, it isn’t crucial how it’s shot. Chaplin had such a simple cinematic style that it was almost like I Love Lucy, but you were always hypnotised by what was going on, unaware of the essentially non-cinematic style."

The full quote:

“If something is really happening on the screen, it isn’t crucial how it’s shot. Chaplin had such a simple cinematic style that it was almost like I Love Lucy, but you were always hypnotised by what was going on, unaware of the essentially non-cinematic style. He frequently used cheap sets, routine lighting and so forth, but he made great films. His films will probably last longer than anyone else’s

GIF is from The Pawnshop (1916).

An interesting thing about I Love Lucy is that its cinematographer was actually Karl Freund, one of the most celebrated German cinematographers of the silent era

Well, that makes sense. Lucy was good friends with Buster Keaton. He was her mentor. If you rewatch Lucy episodes, many of them have elaborate visual gags and can run half the show with no dialog.

silent comedy

I think if she was born earlier, Lucille Ball definitely would have been at home in

Ouch lol

Dinosaurs fighting in The Lost World (1925)

Hmm. I thought this was a film I'd seen at Chautauqua Institute's main outdoor theatre a few years back, but I'm pretty sure that one featured Zasu Pitts, and I don't see her listed.

IIRC the movie in question had a similar plot, starting out in a museum and moving on to the wild. It also featured some kind of early color process, I think-- sections were tinted red or sepia or blue-ish.

The best part was the fact that an olde-time organist provided the background music live on an elaborate organ installed at the institute. It really was a once-in-lifetime treat for most of us there.

In the movie, the Brontosaurus actually survives the fall, and is transported back to London, where it runs amuk, King Kong style

Shortly afterwards, as the paleontologists are observing the Brontosaurus, an Allosaurus attacks it and the Brontosaurus falls off the edge of the plateau, becoming trapped in a mud bank at the base of the plateau. Soon afterwards, a volcano erupts causing a mass stampede among the giant creatures of the lost world. The crew is saved when Paula's pet monkey Jocko climbs up the plateau carrying a rope. The crew use the rope to pull up a rope ladder constructed by Zambo and Austin and then climb down.

As Ed makes his descent, he is again attacked by the apeman who pulls the rope ladder. The apeman is again shot and finally killed by Roxton. They discover the Brontosaurus that had been pushed off the plateau had landed softly in the mud of the river, trapped but still alive, and Challenger manages to bring it back to London, as he wants to put it on display as proof of his story.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_World_(1925_film)

The fall cracks me up. “OH SHIIIIIIIIIIIT”

You know he dead

Robot Maria is burned at the stake in Metropolis (1927)

Fun fact: given the age of the film, it went through multiple remastered versions of middling quality since no one knew how it had been edited. It wasn't until 2008, when an almost perfect original negative of the film was found in Argentina, that we recovered the movie as a whole and made the "compete" edition in 2010.

Given how influential this was to science fiction, I always suggest fans of the genre make the time to watch it.

Watched this movie for the first time in my freshman year of college. Seriously impressive what they were able to pull off.

I remember when TCM showed it for the first time in its entirety, I watched and was so fascinated.

What a coincidence, just watched this film today!

For Harold Lloyd's 125th birthday, here's his most famous scene (Safety Last! 1923)

An interesting thing I just learned about Harold Lloyd's birthday is that a woman born exactly the same day as him actually lived until November of 2008, becoming the oldest person in the world in the process.

If you happen to live in the Portland (OR) area, you can come see it in the theater with live organ accompaniment on Saturday 4/28!

Harold Lloyd would approve, he felt that his movies should always be accompanied by an organ (rather than a mere piano)

Edna Parker

Edna Ruth Parker (née Scott) (April 20, 1893 – November 26, 2008) was an American supercentenarian and, until her death, was recognized as the oldest person in the world following the death of Yone Minagawa of Japan on August 13, 2007.

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I made some GIFs for Charlie Chaplin's birthday

I made some GIFs for Charlie Chaplin's birthday

Chaplin was inspired to build an escalator set after seeing someone trip on one while he was visiting New York.

The Macy's flagship store in New York still has a few wooden escalators that are almost 100 years old.

TIL They had escalators 100+ years ago.

I did make all them all. A few I'd already made and had sitting around on my hard drive, but most of them I just finished making before I posted this. 

Some of them were remakes of GIFs I'd made before, in part because my system for naming and organizing GIFs is kind of terrible, so it's sometimes faster to just remake them. I've improved my GIF making method over time, so sometime I like to make a new version of a GIF to get a proper aspect ratio or a higher frame rate or a cleaner looking loop or whatever.

Right now I've got 40 GB of GIFs I've made sitting in a folder on a hard drive, but trying to find any given GIF can be kind of a pain.

I did make all them all. A few I'd already made and had sitting around on my hard drive, but most of them I just finished making before I posted this.

Some of them were remakes of GIFs I'd made before, in part because my system for is kind of terrible, so it's sometimes faster to just remake them. I've improved my GIF making method over time, so sometime I like to make a new version of a GIF to get a proper aspect ratio or a higher frame rate or a cleaner looking loop or whatever.

Right now I've got 40 GB of GIFs I've made sitting in a folder on a hard drive, but trying to find any given GIF can be kind of a pain.

The earliest known example of the dancing rolls on film is from . Chaplin certainly added a lot to the routine, though.

Charlie Chaplin in A Dog's Life, which was released 100 years ago today

Still incredibly funny. I love when he reaches out after his little victory dance and touches the other policeman’s badge.

This is my Father’s favorite Chaplin movie, so many classic sequences.

Chaplin's fight to get to the counter at the employment office

There are some pretty great parts:

Chaplin stealing meat pies, which is a great chance to see him working with his brother Syd, recreating something they had originally done on stage.

Chaplin knocking out Albert Austin and using him like a puppet

Also one of Edna Purviance's funniest performances

Must be a common running gag. I've noticed it in numerous Chaplin and Keaton films.

A nice bit of comic timing from Charlie Chaplin in Pay Day (1922)

Or something just shouting.... it is silent film after all.

I wonder if there's a mirror in front of him so he could make sure he had the correct timing.

I Hate It When My Coat Keeps teleporting out of my arm

Try one of these subthreads