history

What kinds of technology would people be surprised to find from different time periods?

What kinds of technology would people be surprised to find from different time periods?

I was reading about George Mallory and his contemporaries using bottled oxygen way back in 1922-24 during their attempts up Everest and I was pretty surprised (which maybe not surprising to most people) so I was wondering what other examples there would be.

The ancient Romans had a recipe for concrete that would set underwater. After the collapse of their empire, that recipe was lost for nearly 2000 years. Modern examination of the concrete has finally revealed the recipe to us, described as one of "the most durable building materials in history".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_concrete

Indoor plumbing by the Minoans

A Moghul in India had air conditioning. Basically circulating cool water much like a swamp cooler.

Meso Americans made toys with wheels but for some reason never used them for big wagons.

During the American revolution, a wooden submarine called the Turtle was built and used in an attempt to attach explosives to the underside of British ships in New York Harbor. It failed at that, but did apparently succeed in at least submerging and moving underwater and then safely resurfacing.

That chemical weapons, such as those used in WWI were created by a man in the late 17th to early 18th century. When he presented it to King Louis XIV, he paid the man an annual salary so as to not sell the technology to anyone else.

I’m Kristin Romey, the National Geographic Archaeology Editor and Writer. I've spent the past year or so researching what archaeology can—or cannot—tell us about Jesus of Nazareth. AMA!

I’m Kristin Romey, the National Geographic Archaeology Editor and Writer. I've spent the past year or so researching what archaeology can—or cannot—tell us about Jesus of Nazareth. AMA!Hi my name is Kristin Romey and I cover archaeology and paleontology for National Geographic news and the magazine. I wrote the cover story for the Dec. 2017 issue about “The Search for the Real Jesus.” Do archaeologists and historians believe that the man described in the New Testament really even existed? Where does archaeology confirm places and events in the New Testament, and where does it refute them? Ask away, and check out the story here: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/12/jesus-tomb-archaeology/

Exclusive: Age of Jesus Christ’s Purported Tomb Revealed: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/11/jesus-tomb-archaeology-jerusalem-christianity-rome/

Proof: https://i.redd.it/4ji9owrtrq001.jpg

https://twitter.com/NatGeo/status/935886282722566144

EDIT: Thanks redditors for the great ama! I'm a half-hour over and late for a meeting so gotta go. Maybe we can do this again! Keep questioning history! K
I’m Kristin Romey, the National Geographic Archaeology Editor and Writer. I've spent the past year or so researching what archaeology can—or cannot—tell us about Jesus of Nazareth. AMA!

Hi my name is Kristin Romey and I cover archaeology and paleontology for National Geographic news and the magazine. I wrote the cover story for the Dec. 2017 issue about “The Search for the Real Jesus.” Do archaeologists and historians believe that the man described in the New Testament really even existed? Where does archaeology confirm places and events in the New Testament, and where does it refute them? Ask away, and check out the story here: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/12/jesus-tomb-archaeology/

Exclusive: Age of Jesus Christ’s Purported Tomb Revealed: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/11/jesus-tomb-archaeology-jerusalem-christianity-rome/

Proof:

https://twitter.com/NatGeo/status/935886282722566144

EDIT: Thanks redditors for the great ama! I'm a half-hour over and late for a meeting so gotta go. Maybe we can do this again! Keep questioning history! K

For this story, it's probably how the Jewish community became increasingly observant as the Roman occupation progressed- it was a real reaction to pagan authority

What is the most interesting thing you have discovered throughout your research?

Finding physical/archaeological evidence to prove that a specific individual existed in ancient times is a very rare thing. Usually only happens if you were powerful enough to get your face on a coin or your name in an inscription.

Look at Socrates, for instance: we know about him through other accounts (Plato, Aristophanes etc) but what’s the physical evidence?

How was the assassination of Lincoln perceived in Europe?

How was the assassination of Lincoln perceived in Europe?

I'm curious to know to what extent (if at all) Europe cared about the assassination of Lincoln? I know that American news was hardly ever talked about or covered in the 19th century, but was there any kind of dialogue or understanding by the people/leaders of Europe?

They cared quite a bit. He wasn't deified in other countries like he was here, but he was still an extremely powerful symbol to people all over the world. Plus, as the Atlantic put it: "in 1865, the assassination of a head of state still retained its power to stun and horrify." One British newspaper called it the most momentous murder since Caesar.

Link: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/04/how-the-world-mourned-lincoln/390465/

This is quite surprising actually. I would have thought not many outsiders would care much about American politics pre-superpower status.

Russian author Leo Tolstoy considered him the world’s greatest hero according to one man’s account of a conversation with him near the end of his life.

"But you have not told us a syllable about the greatest general and greatest ruler of the world. We want to know something about him. He was a hero. He spoke with a voice of thunder; he laughed like the sunrise and his deeds were strong as the rock and as sweet as the fragrance of roses. The angels appeared to his mother and predicted that the son whom she would conceive would become the greatest the stars had ever seen. He was so great that he even forgave the crimes of his greatest enemies and shook brotherly hands with those who had plotted against his life. His name was Lincoln and the country in which he lived is called America, which is so far away that if a youth should journey to reach it he would be an old man when he arrived. Tell us of that man."

Heh,that was a cool read. Thank you

What is the history of names that end with -son?

What is the history of names that end with -son?

Im guessing Jackson was son of Jack, Johnson was son of John, Yoshua bin Yosef was son of Yosef...but I was wondering if anyone knows the origin of this practice and how it transcended through historical cultures

In Scandinavian cultures this is how last name conventions work. Your born, first name John, your dad is Steve. Your name is John Steveson. Your kid is gonna be kid Johnson. People from the areas of Scandinavia that have these naming conventions come to live in areas that don't and they and their lineage get stuck with what ever name they came over on the boat with.

At least at one time, rules applied for daughters too, so Joanna, daughter of Steve, would be Joanna Stevesdatter

(source, the Norwegian historical novel Kristin Lavrensdatter)

i would be surprised if this wasn't independently started numerous times in different cultures since children have been receiving names. in a patriarchal patrilineal society, it makes sense that sons would get "son of ______" as part of their name.

This was common throughout the middle ages. The suffixes varied from -dottir (Iceland) to -dotter (Sweden) with various forms inbetween. The nobilty during this time would have three names, their given name, their "father's name + son/dottir" and the name of their family. For example, the full name of Gustav I before he was elected king of Sweden was Gustav Eriksson Vasa.

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution.

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution.

100 years ago today (November 7th, 1917), the Bolsheviks started what would be known as the October Revolution. This insurrection against Czarist Russia the Duma's Provisional Government would plunge Russia and Eastern Europe into an era of Soviet domination for nearly a century. While the initial impact of this event seemed mild, it would light a worldwide wildfire that's effects are still felt to this day.

Read more about the October Revolution:

http://www.history.com/topics/russian-revolution https://www.britannica.com/topic/October-Revolution-Russian-history http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/07/day-1917-bolsheviks-seize-power-russian-october-revolu...

Follow the events live as they would've happened 100 years ago: https://project1917.com/october

Edit: They fought against the provisional government at the time, not the czar

The February revolution was against Czarist Russia. The October revolution was against the Russian Provisional Government.

Russia was still using the old Julian calendar when this happened. It wasn't till January of 1918 that they switched to the Gregorian calendar. The difference between both calendars is 13 days.

Fun fact: Lenin shaved his beard and put on a wig on his way to the revolution to avoid being arrested and was almost busted by a guard on a train. Had that guard arrested Lenin world history would've looked a lot different.

Ah yes that famous October revolution that happened in NOVEMBER

What were you even doing Russia?

I am Mike Duncan, author of THE STORM BEFORE THE STORM and the podcaster behind “The History of Rome” and “Revolutions.” AMA!

I am Mike Duncan, author of THE STORM BEFORE THE STORM and the podcaster behind “The History of Rome” and “Revolutions.” AMA!Hi, my name is Mike Duncan and I am one of the foremost history podcasters in the world, with over 100 million episode downloads. My award-winning series The History of Rome remains one of the most popular history podcasts on the internet. My current show, Revolutions, explores the great political revolutions of modern history. I am also the author of the New York Times bestseller: THE STORM BEFORE THE STORM: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic, out now from PublicAffairs. Ask me anything.

Proof: https://i.redd.it/p51wi50sa8vz.jpg
I am Mike Duncan, author of THE STORM BEFORE THE STORM and the podcaster behind “The History of Rome” and “Revolutions.” AMA!

Hi, my name is Mike Duncan and I am one of the foremost history podcasters in the world, with over 100 million episode downloads. My award-winning series The History of Rome remains one of the most popular history podcasts on the internet. My current show, Revolutions, explores the great political revolutions of modern history. I am also the author of the New York Times bestseller: THE STORM BEFORE THE STORM: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic, out now from PublicAffairs. Ask me anything.

Proof:

They certainly understood that there were different nationalities inside the empire, but in the main, the Romans of his high imperial age viewed each other through the lens of legal status. Were you a citizen? A slave? A provincial subject? A freedman? Those were the basic building blocks.

OK that was tons of fun. Sorry I couldn't get to everyone. There are so many and they are still coming! But I have to get back to writing this week's episode of Revolutions. Metternich is going doooowwwwwnnnnnn

Well obv I was routinely baffled by the conduct of King Charles I in the Eng Civil Wars. And then his later namesake King Charles X during the leadup to July 1830 is a classic case of more or less overthrowing yourself.

Ichiro is the Hit Emperor

Hi Mike,

The distinction between Roman and Italian is a prevalent one during the time period covered by your book. Clearly, the divisions and distinctions that the Romans placed between themselves and those that they deemed as allies/ conquered peoples were significant, and helped to precipitate conflicts such as the Social War. Were these distinctions still in place during the age of the Antonines? Did the concept of a uniform nationality exist during the Roman period(s)?

I am Indy Neidell, from THE GREAT WAR and I am currently retelling the Cuban Missile Crisis with my new side project Time Ghost

I am Indy Neidell, from THE GREAT WAR and I am currently retelling the Cuban Missile Crisis with my new side project Time Ghost
I am Indy Neidell, from THE GREAT WAR and I am currently retelling the Cuban Missile Crisis with my new side project Time Ghost

"hello /sub/history,

I am Indy Neidell, writer and host of THE GREAT WAR on YouTube (youtube.com/thegreatwar).

But I also just launched a new project called Time Ghost - and our first series there is following the Cuban Missile Crisis day by day:

Some more mildly interesting facts about me:

I played and toured (and still do) in a variety of bands I am from Houston, TX (Go Astros!) I live in Stockholm, Sweden I graduated from Wesleyan University (with an honors thesis about the Black Death) I once operated an illegal Youth Hostel in Scotland called "Buzz Aldrin's Travelers Club"

AMA!

Proof: https://imgur.com/a/CNNnB

Thanks a lot guys, I gotta run now- gotta go see the Astros game (I'm in Houston today). I'll try to answer some more questions over the next few days. thanks, always fun doing these. Indy

I can't think if any questions off the top of my head but I just wanted to say a great big thank you to yourself and the team for the work you do!

How important some of the lesser fronts were- for example, the Romanian front could have decided the war.

Well, a very big your welcome back at you!

What is the most surprising thing you've found in your research for the show?

What are good sources to learn about the Khmer Rouge regime?

What are good sources to learn about the Khmer Rouge regime?

I want to learn more about the topic because I am not figuring the big picture of this era in Cambodia's history yet, so it makes me very curious. Are there any books that are recommended?

First they killed my father, I believe that's the name of a book that I read in high school about one ladies life during that time.

First they killed my father

It's a netflix movie directed by angelina jolie. it's entirely in khmer, with english subtitles. very good movie, it captures what a long horror it was....

i visited cambodia a few years back (siam reap, angkor wat etc). absolutely wonderful people, which is all the more amazing considering the hell they endured just two generations ago.

it's not over yet... amputees from mines are common - there are approximately five million landmines in cambodia waiting to be stepped on.....

FUN FACT: there are some 80 MILLION unexploded ordinances (bombs) in Laos. (that's 80 million, yes, with an M)

I actually just left Cambodia and am currently in Vietnam. If you ever get a chance to go to SE Asia, I would suggest going to see the killing fields and the museum in Phnom Penh, and the war memorials in Ho Chi Minh (Saigon). It brings it to a whole different level actually seeing it.

The killing fields are particularly disturbing because so many people were killed that bones and clothes are still frequently unearthed by rain. They're collected every couple of months. There is a tree that was used to kill babies where the Khmer Rouge soldiers would swing the babies by their feet and smash their heads into the tree. It was really disturbing to see the fractured baby skulls.

It's also been adapted to a movie on Netflix. I wasn't aware of the book, but I enjoyed the film a lot.

Why the trial by ordeal was actually an effective test of guilt

Why the trial by ordeal was actually an effective test of guilt

What's to prevent a guilty person who's figured out the game to just plead innocent then and get away with it?

Nothing at all.

But I imagine that the process was uneven enough that you could never quite be sure.

And if you were a person with a reputation for being a criminal or a low sort, it is possible that the priest in many instances might have actually decided to stoke the fire and let God have a go at it Himself.

If the priest hates you, you're done for.

I'm actually learning about this now in school, and I have a major point of contention with this article: According to my professor the priests wouldn't "fake the miracles." When they stuck someone with a hot iron, part of the test involved seeing if the wound would heal (which would be up to the cleric's discretion). Similarly, if they dunk someone in the river and they were sinking (the sign they were innocent), they'd pull them up before they'd drown (and the reason why this would work is because a vast majority of people couldn't swim).

Sure, the greatest impact of these were to scare confessions out of people (which worked), but this article doesn't acknowledge the fact that Trial by Ordeals were a big problem back then, and the ultimate reason why they were banned in 1215 was because they were seen by the Church (and monarchs actually) as crude and ignorant methods of determining a person's guilt.

Edit: people couldn't swim not wouldn't, my bad.

Finnish Defence Forces have released over 160 000 war photos from 1939-1945

Finnish Defence Forces have released over 160 000 war photos from 1939-1945

TIL the Finnish military adopted the swastika before the Nazis and still wear it on their air force uniforms and flags to this day. Bold choice, Finland.

In 2013 The Finnish Defence Forces released more than 160.000 war time photos from 1939 to 1945 to the public on internet. The photos cover the Winter War, the Continuation War and the Lapland War both at the front and at homes. All branches of the FDF are covered. It took 3½ years to digitize the negatives.

Heads up: some of the pictures of the battlefield taken by combat photographers might be quite graphic.

Site is available in Finnish, Swedish and English.

Here are some highlights by The Atlantic, if you don't want to just browse aimlessly.

This archive of course includes photos that were taken for propaganda purposes, but those had been released straight away. The real gems are photos that were not available to the public until now, 70 years after they were taken. They show the non-romanticized face of war that was originally meant to stay hidden from the public.

Finland don't give a fuck.

https://imgur.com/a/r4nSW This is what i had in my sleeve in 2015 8)

Try one of these subthreads