Futurology futurology

New technology in China turns desert into land rich with crops

New technology in China turns desert into land rich with crops

Okay, awesome. If it stays that way. I guess we'll wait to have to see if it needs constant maintenance?

It is a big deal

Uh yes. I still don't understand how there are so many people that think human pollution has no effect on climate.

Turning areas like the Sahara, Australia and the Southwestern US into green belts would go a long way to eliminating hunger (and CO2 emissions if you think it's a big deal).

Porsche’s all-electric Tesla rival could cost less than $100,000

Porsche’s all-electric Tesla rival could cost less than $100,000

Awesome. Let me just go find that other $99,999 that's inconveniently missing from my bank account.

Nice to see more companies making electric cars.

As long as it doesn't look like a Cayenne, people will buy it. Goddamn that model looks stupid.

What our view of the moon might look like within the next 100 years...

What our view of the moon might look like within the next 100 years...

I find it extremely unlikely that they would build a colony that size.

USA for scale: https://www.reddit.com/sub/MapPorn/comments/18gyym/to_give_some_sense_of_scale_the_united_states/

The lit up areas would be part of the colony itself so a colony about the size of 1/4 of the USA. All of it man made structures, no fields, parks or yards or whatever to space it out. Even if they did somehow make it that big, there would be no reason to light the outside.

Ohhhh, thats a moonbase. On mobile it looks like the moon got a chunk blown off of it.

No Mars is perfect as it is, I especially like the lack of humans

I just realized that night on a moon base is going to last 14 days.

CEO Jessica Versteeg, ParagonCoin Company Story, Cryptocurrencies and ICOs

CEO Jessica Versteeg, ParagonCoin Company Story, Cryptocurrencies and ICOs

It sounds like: hey cannabis is hot, blockchain is hot. Just combine the two and we are gonna be rich.

Yeah proven scam, some dodgy Russian and model decide to use the blockchain to fleece investors, nothing to see here.

Check the account that posted this, my guess is its a paid account...

Shameless advertisement for a useless bitcoin/ether fork that's going to have 0 uses beside being a Ponzi scheme. They obviously tried way too hard to hop on the crypto bandwagon and make a "cool" new coin by making it related to the "cool" weed.

Downvoted. Don't bother replying because I disabled inbox replies and not coming back to this thread. Also going to downvote the other thread in /sub/videos.

Be carefull, cryptocurrencies are great but it attracts scams as well. This one is a total scam.

Due to excessive lobbying from FPL, Florida residents without power due to the hurricane are not permitted to use their own solar panels

Due to excessive lobbying from FPL, Florida residents without power due to the hurricane are not permitted to use their own solar panels
Due to excessive lobbying from FPL, Florida residents without power due to the hurricane are not ...

Every legal installation has a switch to disconnect from the grid. In many places That switch has to be reachable from the road.

I think you're talking about a contactor. It makes a lot of sense at first glance. If you had a double throw contactor, if the grid goes down, then coil becomes de-energized and your house is automatically isolated from the grid. So there would be a momentary power interruption, the contactor trips, then your house would switch over to inverter power.

The problem arises when a significant percentage of a neighbourhood has solar capacity installed. If you put up solar panels, nobody in their right mind would run inverters and batteries because the cost is high and efficiency is low. These people will almost universally install grid tie inverters. The concern is that the grid-tie solar installations could actually carry the grid enough so that the contactors would never open, and could potentially get these wild swings in voltage on the grid side.

So I can see where the power company is coming from. Right now we don't have an issue because the installed grid-tie solar capacity is low, and grid-tie inverters use the grid as their clock source to synchronise with. If the grid stops, so do the inverters. Extremely quickly too. I think like half a cycle or something. So there is no danger to workers. But if there's enough grid-tie weight in the system, the inverters could potentially synchronise off of each other and keep supplying power to a system that has a fault.

Edit: Realistically this is no different than people wanting generators at their home. You need a transfer switch. Period. If some bonehead decides to make a double ended extension cord and plug it in to an outlet in their house, you could easily electrocute some hapless worker who is trying to repair downed lines.

Well, yeah. Look - I'm all for solar, and I think that private utility companies should be nationalised and put under democratic and local control. These guys are clearly crooks and rentiers, and not worth defending. That being said...

When repairing lines, linemen often get killed when the power's out. Why? Some asshole running a generator, backfeeding the system. That kills people every year. Electricity is nothing to fuck with, and the utility companies, in this case, are right to put the efficient return of power to all and the safety of their employees ahead of "just trusting" people who have (probably) no expertise in electrical work to run their own shit. You gonna gamble your workers' lives on grandma's electrical ability?

Sometimes that bad guys do the right thing, and that's the case here.

Why not make that switch energised by the national grid, disconcerting and isolates the other supply during national grid outages, seems like this would be easier to regulate. In fact this could be driven by any of the new range of smart meters that power companies are pushing onto us.

Solar installations are growing faster than people realize, says panel maker: "Now, around the world, solar energy costs about 8 cents a kilowatt hour. That's down 70% since 2010, and those costs are going to continue to come down as we develop the technology."

Solar installations are growing faster than people realize, says panel maker: "Now, around the world, solar energy costs about 8 cents a kilowatt hour. That's down 70% since 2010, and those costs are going to continue to come down as we develop the technology."
Solar installations are growing faster than people realize, says panel maker: "Now, around the wo...

My dad doubts climate change and we got some for our roof. Just makes economic sense.

That's heartening. Just wondering why people don't believe scientists / specialists anymore? Not picking on your dad in particular just wondering out loud, it's everywhere. I definitely know there is a boat load that I don't know

I've used the term "Solarchy" to refer to the impending energy utopia that solar power will enable.

When you think about it, such a thing would not be exclusively economic in nature: So many horrific political phenomena have been driven by fossil fuels over the years, and those phenomena will just evaporate, with nothing even resembling an analogous issue replacing it due to solar energy.

Solar is a technology, not a limited commodity that can be strictly controlled, and even its feeder commodities are all over the world rather than concentrated in a few places. Any country that tries to corner it will just sabotage its own interests by motivating other countries to develop local resources, so one way or another this industry becomes ubiquitous and decentralized.

No long-term monopoly or oligopoly is even possible. Only short-term ones, with each step spreading the technology further and the cost lower.

Just wondering why people don't believe scientists / specialists anymore?

Disillusionment with government and the media would be part ofthe reason. Give it some time though, once summers start ending in November people will believe..

Scientists find fungus with an appetite for plastic in rubbish dump - Aspergillus tubingensis secretes enzymes onto the surface of the plastic that break the chemical bonds between the plastic molecules, or polymers.

Scientists find fungus with an appetite for plastic in rubbish dump - Aspergillus tubingensis sec...

"Life, uh, finds a way"

-Dr Ian

Jurassic Park (the only good one)

So what happens when this gets out of the rubbish dump and into our world filled with plastic cars, boats, structures and products. Won't that just degrade basically everything? Maybe thinking on the extreme side of things but seems like a legitimate concern.

There are fungi that eat wood, but wood is still useful for tons of applications

Journal reference:

Khan, S., et al.,

Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by Aspergillus tubingensis,

Environmental Pollution (2017),

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.03.012

Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749117300295?via%3Dihub

Highlights

• Aspergillus tubingensis was isolated, identified, and found to degrade polyurethane (PU).

• The SEM and ATR-FTIR results clearly showed the degradation on the surface of PU.

• Esterase and lipase activities were determined in the presence of different supplements to medium.

• This is the first report showing A. tubingensis capable of degrading PU.

Abstract

The xenobiotic nature and lack of degradability of polymeric materials has resulted in vast levels of environmental pollution and numerous health hazards. Different strategies have been developed and still more research is being in progress to reduce the impact of these polymeric materials. This work aimed to isolate and characterize polyester polyurethane (PU) degrading fungi from the soil of a general city waste disposal site in Islamabad, Pakistan. A novel PU degrading fungus was isolated from soil and identified as Aspergillus tubingensis on the basis of colony morphology, macro- and micro-morphology, molecular and phylogenetic analyses. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways in the presence of 2% glucose: (a) on SDA agar plate, (b) in liquid MSM, and (c) after burial in soil. Our results indicated that this strain of A. tubingensis was capable of degrading PU. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we were able to visually confirm that the mycelium of A. tubingensis colonized the PU material, causing surface degradation and scarring. The formation or breakage of chemical bonds during the biodegradation process of PU was confirmed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The biodegradation of PU was higher when plate culture method was employed, followed by the liquid culture method and soil burial technique. Notably, after two months in liquid medium, the PU film was totally degraded into smaller pieces. Based on a comprehensive literature search, it can be stated that this is the first report showing A. tubingensis capable of degrading PU. This work provides insight into the role of A. tubingensis towards solving the dilemma of PU wastes through biodegradation.

Until now it was believed Alzheimer's disease could destroy the memories, but a new study reveals that it actually blocks them

Until now it was believed Alzheimer's disease could destroy the memories, but a new study reveals that it actually blocks them
Until now it was believed Alzheimer's disease could destroy the memories, but a new study reveals...

Kind of makes sense...old folks at work would remember me some days, nothin the next.

Basically this means that we originally thought that one someone with Alzheimer’s lost a memory it was gone, instead it’s locked away and we can find a key to open it back up to them.

Agreed. Nothing would be more amazing than bringing the person back locked away inside an Alzheimer afflicted brain

I guess this means that if we ever found a cure, we could potentially see a full recovery with most of the memories still intact. This is great news for advanced stages of Alzheimer i guess, means that there could still be hope for some kind of recovery, if we find a complete cure that is...

Tesla Semi could be ‘the biggest catalyst in trucking in decades’ and 70% cheaper to operate, says Morgan Stanley analyst

Tesla Semi could be ‘the biggest catalyst in trucking in decades’ and 70% cheaper to operate, say...

I really hope this thing has a 500 mile range and beats the shit out of any other offering on the market.

i work on 5-ton trucks in the LA area, and an electric truck with 300-400mi range would work great!

i think our drivers would be upset, bc they like their diesels... but transpo would get a hard-on for the reduced cost.

edit: my situation deals with soley in-town driving. no long-hauling. an electric truck would work for this very well, because the range limitation would be somewhat negligible. self-driving is a whole different ball game.

I'd think the drivers would be more upset that they're one step closer to being out of a job than not using diesel.

"We all will stop working if you implement this!"

"Yeah that's the idea."

"Shit"

The U.S. House on Wednesday unanimously approved a sweeping proposal to speed the deployment of self-driving cars without human controls and bar states from blocking autonomous vehicles.

The U.S. House on Wednesday unanimously approved a sweeping proposal to speed the deployment of self-driving cars without human controls and bar states from blocking autonomous vehicles.
The U.S. House on Wednesday unanimously approved a sweeping proposal to speed the deployment of s...

"Bipartisan" now that's a word I haven't heard in a long time.

When it leads to greater profits all around, everyone is on board! Just shows you where their priorities are. Not that im opposed to this particular decision - im all in favor of autonomous vehicles as long as we deal with the negative consequences (which im sure we wont)

This is incredible. I always thought our Congress couldn't pass a flags for orphans bill nowadays.

Nice to hear good news every now and then.

as long as we deal with the negative consequences

The only real negative consequences I can think of would be job losses due to automating out transportation services and maaaaaaaaaybe security concerns due to self-driving vehicles getting hacked.

With the former I imagine the government's hand will eventually be forced and they will have to implement some kind of social safety net (UBI or a negative income tax or whatever) to prevent the kind of mass social degradation that will naturally result from a new Great Depression. The latter is just business as usual, albeit with slightly higher stakes than before (I say 'slightly' because there are inevitably going to be multiple redundant safeguards against such a scenario in every autonomous vehicle).

The vehicles themselves? 100% superior drivers than humans in pretty much every scenario outside of specific low-visibility scenarios (like a massive blinding blizzard), and even then, technology can find ways to circumvent those issues thanks to not being limited to human eyes and ears. I'm not terribly concerned about that aspect.

Try one of these subthreads