books

Horror in Translation: 8 Chilling Reads From Around the World

Horror in Translation: 8 Chilling Reads From Around the World
Horror in Translation: 8 Chilling Reads From Around the World

The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf Translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky (NYRB, 2013)

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt Translated from the Dutch by Nancy Forest-Flier (Tor Books, 2016)

Queen of K’n-Yan by Asamatsu Ken Translated from the Japanese by Kathleen Taji (Kurodahan Press, 2008)

Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist Translated from the Swedish by Ebba Segerberg (Thomas Dunne Books, 2007)

Black Tea and Other Tales by Samuel Marolla Translated from the Italian by Andrew Tanzi (Acheron Books, 2014)

Now You’re One of Us by Asa Nonami Translated from the Japanese by Michael Volek and Mitsuko Volek (Vertical, 2007)

Goth by Otsuichi Translated from the Japanese by Andrew Cunningham (Haikasoru, 2015)

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin Translated from the Spanish by Megan McDowell (Riverhead Books, 2017)

I actually am Dutch and I gifted Hex to a horror loving friend of mine not really knowing what she'd think, but she was blown away. It's still on my to-read after that. Good horror and an opportunity for national pride!

I've been getting into horror lately from reading Junji Ito's works so OP's post came at the right time!

Just read Fever Dream. It wasn't horror so much, but it was definitely harrowing; I was certainly anxious and on-edge for the couple of hours it took to read. Great book.

Amazon’s first bookstore in New York City sucks the joy out of buying books

Amazon’s first bookstore in New York City sucks the joy out of buying books

I have a nice little bookstore nearby that has a great atmosphere but basically when I want a book, they order it off Amazon and I end up paying a middleman "finders fee".

I don't mind doing it occassionally to support them, but sometimes it's easier, cheaper and faster to just buy the ebook or book from Amazon.

Edit: words

Bit of a digression from the article, but all this over-romanticizing over bookstores makes me cringe. I fucking love bookstores, but damn, people in here expecting a daybed to relax on while they read through whatever they want. Test a couple pages, sure, but people are getting out of hand with spending an afternoon wearing down a store's stock with no intention to buy. Go to a library.

This article was a delightful read, firmly entrenched in an idealism of what a bookstore "should" be that likely doesn't exist outside of movies and wistful memories. I love how it asserts that because the store is owned by Amazon, it's not possible for browsers to discuss books or talk about them with one another, as if some nun with a ruler were patrolling the aisles hunting for socialization.

These anti-Amazon articles are hilariously slanted. The big publishers are really trying hard to keep their grip.

Edit: Worth pointing out that the article itself was written before the bookstore is slated to open, so everything the author says about how the public will act, etc, is all complete conjecture, because there's not actually been anyone​ browsing the place for real yet.

Yeah I had a similar experience at a hobby shop. Me: "do you have the new Doom board game?" Him: "no, but I can check our warehouses (it is a small ass shop, there will be no warehouses) *clicks on computer for awhile. Him: "I can have it here in a couple days. It'll be $90." Me: no thanks I'll use my amazon prime membership as well and save 25

My local library is eliminating overdue fees, which it says will cost them 0.3 percent of their yearly income, but could save parents and teachers a LOT in the long run. Thoughts?

My local library is eliminating overdue fees, which it says will cost them 0.3 percent of their y...

Librarian here: there is lots of evidence that fines don't do naything to get people to return materials on time, but that they do prevent people from using the services we offer. Removing fines helps increase access and removes a very real barrier for the people who most need the library's collections and services. Increasing the number of people who use the library is actually "good for business" in the sense that it means more people using the library. For most libraries, losing fines does practically nothing to their actual budget. It's a win win.

My local library recently implemented a barter system for library fines. A person could pay for fines with money if they want, but they can give cans of food to the library instead. One can of food = $1 of fines. All of the food goes to the local food bank.

I think that's a good alternative to fines, but that doesn't eliminate the burden of fines, if just turns them into something different. What I mean is this: if you're one of my patrons for whom a $5 or $10 fine is a hardship, giving five or ten cans of food may also be a hardship. For many of my patrons, a few cans of food is nothing, but I definitely have patrons who couldn't do that. They're the ones we chase off with fines; letting them pay with food doesn't help them because they're already struggling to make ends meet and pay for things like food.

A study from Freakonomics showed that when a daycare introduced late fees, the number of late pickups increased, as parents no longer felt guilty for going overtime. A fee replaced guilt, which used to be a motivator, and then it was seen as a system by which you can fairly 'buy more time'.

So in terms of getting books back sooner, I think it will be effective.

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Novelist Timothy Zahn is the man who saved 'Star Wars,' according to fans

Novelist Timothy Zahn is the man who saved 'Star Wars,' according to fans
Novelist Timothy Zahn is the man who saved 'Star Wars,' according to fans

He named Coruscant, one of the few things he did that has always remained canon (and featured heavily in the prequels). The Imperial Capital had no official name prior to Heir to the Empire.

Long ago in a galaxy far far away.

Thrawn is canon now too (Rebels).

He really did. When "Heir to the Empire" came out, there had been little to no Star Wars content since RotJ came out nearly a decade before. Thanks, in part, to Zahn, the EU was born which provided me with a ton of books to read as I grew up in the 90s and early 00s. There are a few names that I associate with Star Wars and what it means to me: Lucas, Williams, Filoni and Zahn is absolutely included with those.

First time in 20 years I have all my books on shelves

First time in 20 years I have all my books on shelves

I've always had more books than shelf space and inevitably had to keep some books in boxes in the closet (sorry Louis L'Amour), but this weekend I finally finished my wrap-around bookshelf. They're messy and beat-up but I'm pretty happy I've even got room to grow now.

http://imgur.com/a/auUnS

EDIT: So, uh, I guess this is on the front page? Some general trends I've noticed and can address:

I do not have a favorite book, but I have a favorite 30 (currently 29 while I debate what will replace Spin by Robert Charles Wilson that didn't pass muster on a reread this weekend): https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/15431237-justin?shelf=meta_top_thirty&utm_campaign=mybooksn... The string that looks like a noose is my attic access pull cord Yes, I have Battlefield Earth. It's a favorite SciFi adventure story detached from Scientology. Lots of fun, I've read it multiple times. Yes, Twilight is there. I have read them and enjoyed them. I did it before the movies and I have no regrets. I have read and enjoyed many books that fall all over the continuum of quality. I'm not a fan of bagging on books even if I didn't like them. You can keep yelling at me about it but is it really worth your time? I estimate, roughly, that there are 1,200 books. I have read somewhere between 70-80% of the whole library. It's closer to 90% if you just count SciFi/Fantasy books. Yes, the Walking Dead omnibuses are out of order. I've forgotten the face of my father.

But where do you park the Lamborghini

I actually thought a bit about this when I sat back, looked at everything, and thought 'Fuck, that's a lot of money!'

There's, roughly, 1,200 books. Fair number of hardbacks but also paperbacks, many used books, and lots of gifts and donations. If I take a pessimistic average cost of 10 bucks that's $12,000 in books. Accumulated over 23 years. Little over $500 a year. Only a double handful of trips to the movies or out to dinner - and I usually end the year being able to count either of those activities on one hand.

So it takes some mental gymnastics but I can totally convince myself I haven't spent that much money on my books. ;)

Tai Lopez reference, don't worry :)

You've got like 300 books by 10 authors!

Congrats, that must have taken some time. I usually just give my books away every few years, there aren't too many I'm actually going to reread.

Jack White to release children’s book inspired by The White Stripes' song "We’re Going To Be Friends"

Jack White to release children’s book inspired by The White Stripes' song "We’re Going To Be Frie...

I like jack white. Hope the book is great

Awaiting his follow-up children book titled "Seven Nation Army"

Meg is his ex-wife. Sometimes people assumed they were siblings cause they vaguely look and dress alike. They rolled with it

I think "Icky Thump" would make the better kids book.

What is the one "self-help" book you believe actually has the ability to fundamentally change a person for the better?

What is the one "self-help" book you believe actually has the ability to fundamentally change a person for the better?

I know it may be hard to limit it to one book, but I was curious what is the one book of the self-help variety that you would essentially contend is a must read for society. For a long time, I was a fiction buff and little else, and, for the most part, I completely ignored the books that were classified as "self-help." Recently, I've read some books that have actively disputed that stance, so the question in the title came to my head. Mine is rather specific, but that self-help book that changed my perspectives on the trajectory of my life is Emilie Wapnicks's book "How to be Everything." I'm curious what others thing, and was hoping to provoke an interesting discussion. Thanks!

Suicide: The Forever Decision by Dr. Paul G. Quinnette. I am still alive, and it is thanks to this book.

Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl. He was an Austrian psychiatrist that survived the holocaust and developed a treatment called logotherapy. It's based on existentialism in which you determine meaning to your life and the value in what you do and through that can garner some form of happiness.

It's an interesting read from one of the early Austrian "schools of psychiatry". You may have heard of his pal, Sigmund Freud.

edit: added the link to the book.

It sounds lame but "the life changing magic of tidying up" by Marie Kondo. I'm much happier now and my place is tidy as fuck.

The feeling good handbook by Dr. Burns. Chapters 18-23 are the ones on communication that were really great. Feeling good together is an expanded version of those chapters if you want to focus on improving interactions with friends or enemies.

What is a book that you didn't think was good while reading it, only to realize it's greatness after you finished?

What is a book that you didn't think was good while reading it, only to realize it's greatness after you finished?

I have two that come to mind.

100 Years of Solitude. As I was reading it I thought it was boring and hard to follow. But as soon as I read the last sentence I thought "wow, that was an amazingly beautiful book."

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson. I thought it was okay while reading it, good but not captivating. But I find myself thinking about it often even years later. Something about it really stuck with me.

The Stranger by Albert Camus. Four years after reading it, I couldn't for the life of me tell you anything about the plot, except the ending. The theme of the story, though--the struggle to find meaning in a random and illogicial world--has stuck with me to this day. The ending scene in which a staunch atheist almost reconciles his dismay with the world with the existance of a higher power (before ultimately embracing nihilism) is one of the greatest scenes I've ever had the pleasure to read.

The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemmingway, it was the first and only book I read of his, my grandmother was showing me her old books and I asked if I could borrow it. I didn't really like it while I was reading it, but I finished it anyway.

I kept thinking about it. I ended up rereading it twice over the next years.

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro. It seems kind of dull or boring for a lot of the story, and you're wondering why the heck someone would write a whole book about these people, but by the time you get to the end and realize what's coming - wham! All the feels. And you'll be haunted by it for days. You'll want to go back and argue with the characters, yell at them, something to change the way it ends.

Senior year of high school I (a male) had to read The Handmaid's Tale for my AP Literature class. I hated the book, and found the extreme conservatism and lack of development extremely frustrating. It was just page after page of the same monotonous routine, with painfully slow exposition through the main character's memories. I almost requested a different assignment I hated the book so much. A few months after graduation I finally realized that was the point of the book: to make men uncomfortable by portraying the world (albeit a dystopian religious one) through the eyes of a woman. And it worked perfectly on me. After that epiphany I gained massive respect for Atwood and began to really think about sexism in America differently. It made me think about how some things I take for granted as a man are not the same for women. Fantastic book.

To get people to drink less, Victorian Englanders built tons of libraries. It didn’t work

To get people to drink less, Victorian Englanders built tons of libraries. It didn’t work

When have writers ever made people (or themselves) drink LESS...?

Ok, I'm going to let you in a little secret but you can't tell a soul. Promise? Ok. My two favorite things are books and booze. When I retire I'm going to build a bookstore. Right next to it I'm going to build a bar. They will be separate businesses except for a door between the two. You can go and buy a book and you are offered a free drink at the bar. If you buy drinks from the bar you get a $3 gift card good for books next door. You are thus encouraged to go from one place to the other. The bar is called Dr. Jekyll and the bookstore is Mr. Hyde.

Edit: also, the bar would have an old fashioned library kinda vibe while the bookstore would be all state of the art tech.

Victorian Englanders

TIL, a library's size is defined by its tonnage not by how many books it has.

Colorado school district pulls suicide book ‘Thirteen Reasons Why' after 7 students recently killed themselves

Colorado school district pulls suicide book ‘Thirteen Reasons Why' after 7 students recently killed themselves
Colorado school district pulls suicide book ‘Thirteen Reasons Why' after 7 students recently kill...

Seven students at the same school district? That's a suicide epidemic, I can't blame the district for trying to tamp down on anything that might possibly contribute.

Edit: of course the book did not cause any of these students to become suicidal. I just wasn't blaming the school if they wanted to temporarily remove anything from the school that might possibly act as a trigger for other students to follow suit.

The book (and the popular Netflix series) are super polarizing, and I fall in the "It's dangerous for children" camp. The way the work perceives suicide as the only rational end to her suffering is particularly dangerous to teenagers that are already confused enough as is.

My problem with the book is that it seems to Romanticize suicide. Like, "Oh look, now she's dead and everybody loves her!"

Still, I can't imagine it's the cause of the suicides. A factor, maybe, but not the cause.

I wanted to mention that I am in no way supporting the banning of books, not 13 Reasons Why, not The Catcher in the Rye, not any other book about troubled youth that schools like to ban

Obviously when I said I'm against the banning of books, some people have taken it to mean I'm against all banning whatsoever. No, I don't think sixth graders should be reading smut, but banning a book about suicide isn't going to stop suicide. Let young adults read YA Books.

I live in Mesa county. It's really terrible, and no one understands why it's happening. It was an issue before 13 reasons though.

Try one of these subthreads