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Simon and Schuster Cancels Milo Yiannopoulos' Book Over Pro-Paedophilia Remarks

Simon and Schuster Cancels Milo Yiannopoulos' Book Over Pro-Paedophilia Remarks
Simon and Schuster Cancels Milo Yiannopoulos' Book Over Pro-Paedophilia Remarks

Harvey Milk had a relationship with a 16 year old (Jack Galen McKinley) while he himself was in his 30's and he recently had a Navy ship named after him...

EDIT: Down voted for facts? I have nothing against Milk BTW, and don't consider him a pedophile. But the double standard is obvious.

My local Waterstones was doing "Blind Date with a book", where you buy a random book, wrapped up, and I found something I absolutely love!

My local Waterstones was doing "Blind Date with a book", where you buy a random book, wrapped up, and I found something I absolutely love!
My local Waterstones was doing "Blind Date with a book", where you buy a random book, wrapped up, and I found something I absolutely love!

I was reticent at first, given I could get anything, but it turned out really well! Basically, you buy a present, wrapped up, same price as a regular book, and you read what you buy. Well, I unwrapped: A Death in the Family: My Struggle 1 by Karl Ove Knausgård. Before unwrapping it, I'd joked to my SO that they should put in very controversial books like Mein Kampf, and then ironically (or do I mean coincidentally?) I managed to get a book called My Struggle (even worse in the original Norwegian, Min Kamp). I was very downtrodden. "Jesus, it's about death, it's called My Struggle, this is going to be a slog of a read". And yet... I'm absolutely loving it! Turns out it's part of a series (hence the number in the title), and I've been fascinated by every page! Started digging deeper and learned Knausgård is a household name in Norway (apparently) but not so much anywhere else. Any Knausgård fans here? Alternatively, anyone ever bought a book by random and ended up with something they loved?

Edit: So glad to see all the happy blind daters here! I have been trying to reply to as many comments as I can, but I need to sleep before work tomorrow. Thank you everyone for making my night! I wish you all happy reading. :)

Edit 2: Just searching for interviews with Knausgård before I went to bed and I found a review by the amazing and totally undersubscribed channel Better than Food: Book Reviews, which must have slipped under my radar. Here it is, if anyone is interested:

Some libraries do this too. I think I'd be more likely to do it from a library since the only thing wasted if I don't like it is my time.

What book allowed you to develop your ability to finally "think on your own?"

What book allowed you to develop your ability to finally "think on your own?"

I recently have taken up reading again! I'm hoping to read a wide array of books, but as I currently work through my 3rd book I thought of this question. What book taught you to think on your own? My current book is "the defining decade" by Meg Jay. It's great and really analyzes those in their twenties. How we are different/think we are different/ and are all quite similar.

But it reminds me of novels I read and stories/metaphors/songs where I wish I could analyze them like I hear people do. I'm inspired by free thinkers and those who can draw connections between decisions and stories and so on. What allowed you to do this?

Edit: Thanks for some incredible recommendations! Keep them coming too.. but to make it a little more simpler as other commenters have reminded me; the best way to define what I am looking for is "what made you start to think critically?"

Also this is my first post in this subreddit and I appreciate the hospitality. I think I'll make my self at home.

Edit 2: this thread reminds me of Michael Scott's quote about a management book where he says "Read it, I own it! But no, I've never read it." This is me right now with a lot of books that you guys recommend!

"College physics, with an integrated approach to forces and kinematics"

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What's the biggest misinterpretation of any book that you've ever heard?

What's the biggest misinterpretation of any book that you've ever heard?

I was discussing The Grapes of Wrath with a friend of mine who is also an avid reader. However, I was shocked to discover that he actually thought it was anti-worker. He thought that the Okies and Arkies were villains because they were "portrayed as idiots" and that the fact that Tom kills a man in self-defense was further proof of that. I had no idea that anyone could interpret it that way. Has anyone else here ever heard any big misinterpretations of books?

When I was small my Mom read Robin Hood to me. We lived on a farm. I confused "peasants" with "pheasants." I could not understand why the sheriff had it in for those big birds. One day a deputy accidentally road killed a pheasant in front of our house. My thought: "It's still going on."

Happy Birthday, LeVar Burton, host of Reading Rainbow

Happy Birthday, LeVar Burton, host of Reading Rainbow

"I told Pierce a thousand times! I never wanted to meet LeVar Burton! I only wanted a picture! You can't disappoint a picture!"

10 Great Novels on Freedom of Expression That Aren’t 1984

10 Great Novels on Freedom of Expression That Aren’t 1984
10 Great Novels on Freedom of Expression That Aren’t 1984
Pereira Maintains, Antonio Tabucchi (trans. Patrick Creagh) The Flamethrowers, Rachel Kushner Go Tell It on the Mountain, James Baldwin Le Silence de la mer (The Silence of the Sea), Jean Bruller (trans. Cyril Connelly) White Tears, Hari Kunzru It Can’t Happen Here, Sinclair Lewis Gone to the Forest, Katie Kitamura The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Moshin Hamid The Feast of the Goat, Mario Vargas Llosa (trans. Edith Grossman) The Sympathizer, Viet Thanh Nguyen

Try one of these subthreads