NatureIsFuckingLit

πŸ”₯ Giant Clams at Low Tide

In a pinch, giant clams at low tide = natural bidet.

That's when it's really in a pinch.

Just make sure your nuts don't hang too low.

I feel like every time they blow water a different note should play

πŸ”₯ How dead is the Great Barrier Reef?

πŸ”₯ How dead is the Great Barrier Reef?

This is maybe the best coral bleaching video I have seen since graduating with a degree in marine biology. Accurate, not over-sensationalized, and succinct. I spent 3 years working directly with corals in Hawaii, before and at the beginning of this mass bleaching event. Thanks, OP, this is definitely worth a share.

/sub/naturewasfuckinglit

Reefs won't be around much longer.

Killing off the vast majority but a very small subsection will survive in a very small part of the world.

The bleaching is a global event, it's nearly all of the worlds reefs that are going through this process

The majority of Vox's science-related videos are consistently of very high quality. They always backup their claims with data and reputable sources, both in the video itself and in the description.

πŸ”₯ Sea Lion Score

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMDtibc13fc

Video Source:

Occurred off of Steveston Fisherman's Wharf, Richmond B.C. Canada.

The girl was rescued by her family members and bystanders. Nobody was injured in the incident.

But the girl was scarred for life.

I grew up on the Oregon coast and would help my dad sell tuna off his boat. You would not believe how many times we had to yell at people not to dangle their toddlers off the dock to look at the cute sea lions. I've seen what happens when one of those actually bites a person. My dad watched one come out of the water, clamp down on a barking dog's throat and drag it under. They're amazing animals but they're a predator and you don't fuck with them.

If I had a list of rules about life, never giving a wild creature your back would be high on it.

its a sea dog eat land dog world

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πŸ”₯ Dolphins πŸ”₯ In Front Of The South African Coast πŸ”₯

When I was growing up on the South African east coast I used to wake up every morning and look out the window, once a week Id see the dolphins playing then go for a 6am bodyboard in the warm waters. Great way to start the day. I recommended everyone who loves nature and especially the metal aspect to visit South Africa.

If you do make it out to the east coast, make sure you google the sardine run durban ! Every sea creature (including lots of sharks DONT GO IN WATER)goes wild and people line buckets with fresh delicious sardines, especially the portugese community ;)

Definitely my best holiday so far, the diversity of the wildlife is incredible

Thankfully, dolphins in South Africa’s waters are protected by some of the strongest cetacean conservation laws in the world.

So badass! I think these are long-beaked common dolphins (not bottlenose), Latin name Delphinus capensis.

Are you that guy that lived on his parent's boat until his dad sunk it on the way to Hawaii from San Diego so they had to stay in Hawaii for a year and work to make enough money to come home and eventually did but never bought another boat now you remember the boat years fondly but don't know if you would ever do it again because you wouldn't want to force your own family into a lonely life at sea?

πŸ”₯ lava πŸ”₯ dripping into the ocean waves 🌊

I want to stick my hands in it and play with it, but I know that's probably not a good idea.

something about the viscosity of the lava is oddly impressive.

It's lava going into water, we only get cobblestone :(

My guess is not many. I've had the privilege of seeing slow moving, relatively cool lava up close in Hawaii, and could feel very uncomfortable heat from quite a few feet away. This stuff looks quite a bit brighter, and I'm guessing is even hotter, so you would probably get a first degree burn (sunburn level) just from being within arms reach. I think even the most primitive minds that have walked the earth know that hot goo is no-touchy.

TLDR: molten rock is really hot

Hey kids, hide in my mouthπŸ”₯πŸ”₯

That last one ... shit!! Shit shit shit SHIT SHIT!!! whew!

Fun fact: the cuckoo catfish sometimes places it's eggs around these fish's eggs so when they hatch the fish thinks the babies belong to them and have the bigger cuckoo catfish in their mouth too along with the other babies. Then...the baby catfish eats the fish's real babies.

This is a form of protection for the fish. They hide in the parents mouth. They are safe.

Wingspan πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

Wingspan πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

Someone call Nat Geo cause that picture is amazing.

http://i.imgur.com/jBZZuHB.jpg
Ecologist flying in.

I've been seeing an increase in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in my area for the past few years and it makes me super happy! I'm hoping to get a decent photo of one now that I have a real camera.

We have such a badass national symbol! The title mentions wingspan and Bald Eagles have a pretty impressive one; 6 - 8 ft (1.8 - 2.4 m). They're super common in parts of the country, and in Alaska are seen as somewhat of a nuisance as they congregate around landfills and large trash piles.

The beauty in the photo is an adult, with that amazing white head and tail, but they don't develop those distinct characteristics right away. It takes a series of molts over about 5 years to get full adult plumage. In this photo you can see a juvenile next to a full adult.

OP's photo is really something! I'm lookign forward to nice weather and maybe seeing a few of these stunning birds in person this summer. :) Man, Nature is so awesome.

Ecologist flying in.

I've been seeing an increase in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in my area for the past few years and it makes me super happy! I'm hoping to get a decent photo of one now that I have a real camera.

We have such a badass national symbol! The title mentions wingspan and Bald Eagles have a pretty impressive one; 6 - 8 ft (1.8 - 2.4 m). They're super common in parts of the country, and in Alaska are seen as somewhat of a nuisance as they congregate around landfills and large trash piles.

The beauty in the photo is an adult, with that amazing white head and tail, but they don't develop those distinct characteristics right away. It takes a series of molts over about 5 years to get full adult plumage. you can see a juvenile next to a full adult.

OP's photo is really something! I'm lookign forward to nice weather and maybe seeing a few of these stunning birds in person this summer. :) Man, Nature is so awesome.

Fun fact, despite what it seems, this picture is completely authentic

Massive school of fishπŸ”₯

Massive school of fishπŸ”₯

Those look like sardines, they are actually very difficult for sharks to hunt. The swimming of the sardines disorientates them; usually sharks need the help of dolphins to herd the fish.

That's actually neat thanks for the new fact, friend

A shark with a big sea afro

Did you know fish don't actually go to school?

How sea shells move around isπŸ”₯

How sea shells move around isπŸ”₯

I think I saw this on Spongebob once.

That's so fucking weird.

Tl;DR: this is a scallop, not a sea shell

Amateur Marine biologist here: That's a scallop, which moves by clapping its two valves (the shell pieces) together and shooting the displaced water out of the siphon on the tail end of their bodies.

Many of the scallop's relatives also have a shell, as well as some more distant relatives like sea snails. When one of these marine creatures with a shell dies, every part is decomposed but the shell. When these shells wash up on the beach, humans label them as "sea shells".

By definition, sea shells are dead, and cannot move on their own.

Edit: Locale Edit 2: Thanks for the gold! Edit 3: Appease the grammar nazis

Definitely. I didn't think it'd actually be this accurate

πŸ”₯ Nest Building Timelapse

I like how a good portion was just stomping mud with his little bird feet

I'm not a bird doctor, but I do practice bird law. They put the mud on the bottom for legal reasons, as to protect against chick negligence.

That's what I was thinking. Fascinating how that happens though, a layer of mud to keep it sort of waterproof (I'm assuming?) Or maybe just so it's stronger? Bird doctors, can you clarify?

thank you Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law

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