ColorizedHistory

Pablo Picasso wearing a hat and holding a revolver & holster given to him by Gary Cooper - Cannes, 1958

Pablo Picasso wearing a hat and holding a revolver & holster given to him by Gary Cooper - Cannes, 1958

Pablo Picasso carried around this revolver loaded with blanks, which he would shoot at people who asked about the meaning of his paintings.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/pablo-picasso-trivia_n_7018574

Critic: "Excuse me Pablo, but I can't understand this. Please, what is the true meaning?"

Pablo: "Pew, Pew! Pewpewpew! "

Edit: some pew

Crazy to think he was alive in 1958. Whenever I think of Pablo Picasso I think of a guy from the 19th or even 18th century. Don't really know why.

ITT: wait Picasso's not from 5000 years ago?

The Capture of William Joyce, aka "Lord Haw Haw" - Anglo-Irish Fascist politician and Nazi propaganda broadcaster in Germany, May 1945.

The Capture of William Joyce, aka "Lord Haw Haw" - Anglo-Irish Fascist politician and Nazi propaganda broadcaster in Germany, May 1945.

"He lies in an ambulance under armed guard before being taken from British 2nd Army Headquarters to hospital. He had been shot in the thigh at the time of his arrest.

He was captured by British Intelligence Officers in a forest near Flensburg close to the Danish border on May 28 1945.

Apparently Joyce's accent had raised suspicions, and when he went to retrieve his forged identification papers from his pocket, to prove he wasn't Joyce, he was thought to be reaching for a pistol, and was shot in the upper leg by an interpreter attached to the British forces, named Lieutenant Perry.

After recovering for a fortnight in Lueneberg Military Hospital, Joyce was transported back to the U.K on June 16, 1945.

William Joyce was an American-born Fascist sympathiser raised in Ireland who while still holding a British passport had transferred his loyalty to Hitler. He would be found guilty of high treason and hanged at Wandsworth Prison on 3 January 1946, the last person in British history to be hanged for treason."

(Read more - http://www.biography.com/people/william-joyce-17172178)

(Photo source - © IWM BU 6911) No 5 Army Film & Photographic Unit - Bert Hardy via Doug B. @ WW2 Colourised Photos​

Not laughing now.

I know it's totally different being a military interpeter, but I can't help but to think, as a sign language interpeter, how strange it would be to shoot someone you're interpreting for.

Edit: I know it's not the same thing. It just had a connection to my life I found interesting. :-)

The guy was a soldier first and an interpreter second. They didn't take any risks so close to going home.

"On the Other Side" writer, Australian (New Zealand-born) war correspondent, Kate Webb - 1968

"On the Other Side" writer, Australian (New Zealand-born) war correspondent, Kate Webb - 1968
ORIGINAL  

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Kate Webb - 1968
24 March 1943 – 13 May 2007
On The Other Side

New Zealand-born Australian war correspondent for UPI and Agence France-Presse.

"Born Catherine Merrial Webb in Christchurch, New Zealand, Webb moved to Canberra, Australia, with her family while she was still a child. Her father, Leicester Chisholm Webb, was professor of political science at the Australian National University, and her mother, Caroline Webb, was active in women's organisations.Both her parents were killed when Kate was 18.

On 30 March 1958, at age 15, Catherine Webb was charged with the murder of Victoria Fenner, the adopted daughter of Frank Fenner in Canberra. She supplied a rifle and bullets to Fenner and was present when Fenner shot herself. After a Children's Court hearing the charge was dropped.

She graduated from the University of Melbourne, then left to work for the Sydney Daily Mirror. In 1967 she quit the paper and travelled to Vietnam to cover the escalating war. Webb was soon hired by UPI and earned a reputation as a hard-drinking, chain-smoking war correspondent: She was the first wire correspondent to reach the U.S. Embassy in Saigon during the Tet offensive.[With the death of Phnom Penh bureau chief Frank Frosch in 1970, Webb was selected to fill his position—she later claimed it was because she spoke French. In 1971 she made news herself when she was captured by North Vietnamese troops operating in Cambodia. Premature official reports claimed that a body discovered was Webb's, and The New York Times published an obituary. She emerged from captivity 23 days after she was captured, after having endured forced marches, interrogations, and malaria. She described her experiences in a book, On the Other Side, and in War Torn, a collection of reminiscences by women correspondents in the Vietnam War.

After her release from captivity and because of her sudden fame, UPI sent her to Washington DC as their show piece. Soon thereafter she threatened to resign if she did not get a "real job". She was reassigned to the Philippines as the UPI bureau chief in Manila.

After the war, she continued to work as a foreign correspondent for UPI and Agence France-Presse (AFP). She served as a correspondent in Iraq during the Gulf War, in Indonesia as Timor-Leste gained independence, and in South Korea, where she was the first to report the death of Kim Il Song. She also reported from Afghanistan, and later described an incident in Kabul as the most frightening in her career. Following the collapse of Mohammad Najibullah's communist regime, she was captured by a local warlord and brought to a hotel, where she was brutally beaten and dragged up a flight of stairs by her hair. She finally escaped with the help of two fellow journalists, and hid out on a window ledge in the freezing Afghan winter, while the warlord and his men searched the building for her.

Webb retired to the Hunter Region in 2001. She died of bowel cancer on 13 May 2007. AFP established the Kate Webb Journalism Award with a €3,000 to €5,000 prize, awarded annually to a correspondent or agency that best exemplified the spirit of Kate Webb. Webb was commemorated on an Australian postage stamp in 2017.

She is survived by a brother, Jeremy Webb, and a sister, Rachel Miller." - wikipedia

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Kate Webb - 1968 24 March 1943 – 13 May 2007 On The Other Side

New Zealand-born Australian war correspondent for UPI and Agence France-Presse.

"Born Catherine Merrial Webb in Christchurch, New Zealand, Webb moved to Canberra, Australia, with her family while she was still a child. Her father, Leicester Chisholm Webb, was professor of political science at the Australian National University, and her mother, Caroline Webb, was active in women's organisations.Both her parents were killed when Kate was 18.

On 30 March 1958, at age 15, Catherine Webb was charged with the murder of Victoria Fenner, the adopted daughter of Frank Fenner in Canberra. She supplied a rifle and bullets to Fenner and was present when Fenner shot herself. After a Children's Court hearing the charge was dropped.

She graduated from the University of Melbourne, then left to work for the Sydney Daily Mirror. In 1967 she quit the paper and travelled to Vietnam to cover the escalating war. Webb was soon hired by UPI and earned a reputation as a hard-drinking, chain-smoking war correspondent: She was the first wire correspondent to reach the U.S. Embassy in Saigon during the Tet offensive.[With the death of Phnom Penh bureau chief Frank Frosch in 1970, Webb was selected to fill his position—she later claimed it was because she spoke French. In 1971 she made news herself when she was captured by North Vietnamese troops operating in Cambodia. Premature official reports claimed that a body discovered was Webb's, and The New York Times published an obituary. She emerged from captivity 23 days after she was captured, after having endured forced marches, interrogations, and malaria. She described her experiences in a book, On the Other Side, and in War Torn, a collection of reminiscences by women correspondents in the Vietnam War.

After her release from captivity and because of her sudden fame, UPI sent her to Washington DC as their show piece. Soon thereafter she threatened to resign if she did not get a "real job". She was reassigned to the Philippines as the UPI bureau chief in Manila.

After the war, she continued to work as a foreign correspondent for UPI and Agence France-Presse (AFP). She served as a correspondent in Iraq during the Gulf War, in Indonesia as Timor-Leste gained independence, and in South Korea, where she was the first to report the death of Kim Il Song. She also reported from Afghanistan, and later described an incident in Kabul as the most frightening in her career. Following the collapse of Mohammad Najibullah's communist regime, she was captured by a local warlord and brought to a hotel, where she was brutally beaten and dragged up a flight of stairs by her hair. She finally escaped with the help of two fellow journalists, and hid out on a window ledge in the freezing Afghan winter, while the warlord and his men searched the building for her.

Webb retired to the Hunter Region in 2001. She died of bowel cancer on 13 May 2007. AFP established the Kate Webb Journalism Award with a €3,000 to €5,000 prize, awarded annually to a correspondent or agency that best exemplified the spirit of Kate Webb. Webb was commemorated on an Australian postage stamp in 2017.

She is survived by a brother, Jeremy Webb, and a sister, Rachel Miller." - wikipedia

It seems all the best Australians are from New-Zealand.

As soon as a New Zealander becomes famous they automatically gain Australian citizenship. When they fall from grace they become a Kiwi again. It has always been this way.

What a fucking life she had

Queen Victoria, her collie dog Noble, and the Munshi, Abdul Karim. Taken in the Garden Cottage at Balmoral, 1894 or 1895.

Queen Victoria, her collie dog Noble, and the Munshi, Abdul Karim. Taken in the Garden Cottage at Balmoral, 1894 or 1895.

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Hafiz Mohammed Abdul Karim, CIE, CVO (1863 – April 1909), known as "the Munshi", was an Indian attendant of Queen Victoria. He served her during the final fifteen years of her reign, gaining her maternal affection over that time.

Karim was born the son of a hospital assistant near Jhansi in British India. In 1887, the year of Victoria's Golden Jubilee, Karim was one of two Indians selected to become servants to the Queen. Victoria came to like him a great deal and gave him the title of "Munshi" ("clerk" or "teacher"). Victoria appointed him to be her Indian Secretary, showered him with honors, and obtained a land grant for him in India.

In 1890, the Queen had Karim's portrait painted by Heinrich von Angeli. According to the Queen, von Angeli was keen to paint Karim as he had never painted an Indian before and "was so struck with his handsome face and colouring". On 11 July 1890, she wrote to Lansdowne, and the Secretary of State for India Lord Cross, for "a grant of land to her really exemplary and excellent young Munshi, Hafiz Abdul Karim". The aging Queen did not trust her relatives and the Royal Household to look after the Munshi after she was gone, and so sought to secure his future.

The close platonic relationship between Karim and the Queen led to friction within the Royal Household, the other members of which felt themselves to be superior to him. The Queen insisted on taking Karim with her on her travels, which caused arguments between her and her other attendants. Following Victoria's death in 1901, her successor, Edward VII, returned Karim to India and ordered the confiscation and destruction of the Munshi's correspondence with Victoria. Karim subsequently lived quietly near Agra, on the estate that Victoria had arranged for him, until his death at the age of 46.

As the Munshi had no children, his nephews and grandnephews inherited his wealth and properties. The Munshi's family continued to reside in Agra until Indian independence and the partition of India in August 1947, after which they emigrated to Karachi, Pakistan. The estate, including Karim Lodge, was confiscated by the Indian government and distributed among Hindu refugees from Pakistan. Half of Karim Lodge was subsequently divided into two individual residences, with the remaining half becoming a nursing home and doctor's office.

The 2017 feature film Victoria & Abdul, directed by Stephen Frears and starring Ali Fazal as Abdul Karim and Judi Dench as Queen Victoria, offers a fictionalized version of the relationship between Karim and the Queen.

Abdul looks like he’s from 2018....Queen, not so much.

Exactly what I wanted to know, thanks.

Between her and her husband's work to destroy slavery around the world, and stories like this, it sure seems to me as though Victoria was very much a woman ahead of her time in some ways, and worthy of the admiration she received.

That's what 30 years of mourning does to you.

Winston Churchill as a Cornet in the 4th Queen's Hussar's Cavalry, 1895. He was 21 at the time.

Winston Churchill as a Cornet in the 4th Queen's Hussar's Cavalry, 1895. He was 21 at the time.
Here he is 9 years later.  Looking a lot closer to his final form.

Here he is . Looking a lot closer to his final form.

Combat in Cuba, India, Sudan, becoming a POW in South Africa before escaping. Then in 1900 becoming a politician... Sounds a lot like professional athletes getting fat once they are done playing.

This man lived through the last great cavalry charge, to atomic weapons, to seeing a man in space.

that's review brah

Henry Ford - circa 1930

Henry Ford - circa 1930

This picture was taken right after he was made aware that the photographer was Jewish.

Why not? The guy looks like the type who'll say something like "You know what? I could always tell a man's character by his handshake" then start talking about maintaining racial purity.

I’ve never actually seen a photo of Henry Ford until now. Not sure what I expected, but definitely not this.

He looks like a character out of Dishonoured

On 27 January 1945, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration and death camp, was liberated by the Red Army. Photo: The liberation of Bergen-Belsen, April 1945.

On 27 January 1945, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration and death camp, was liberated by the Red Army. Photo: The liberation of Bergen-Belsen, April 1945.

Being so exhausted and malnourished that barbed wire makes a good back rest is something I hope I or any other never have to experience. I hope the world is learning, but I can't say I am optimistic.

That was what struck me...I honesty thought, how could they do that, it would be so uncomfortable and hurt their back...and then quickly realized that they were used to so so so much worse. That leaves a sick feeling in my stomach.

The first Soviet officer in the camp was Anatoly Shapiro. He was a Ukrainian Jew. I think it's fitting that a Jewish man was the commanding officer of the unit that liberated Auschwitz. I had the honor of meeting him before he passed away (he was friends with my grandma). He passed away in New York in 2005.

When I was in junior high school, our janitor, who was a survivor, showed us his number tattoo and told us of how the commandant had bullwhipped one of his eyes out and that’s why he had one glass eye.

Four female pilots leaving their ship, Pistol Packin' Mama, at the four engine school at Lockbourne AAF. They are members of a group of Women Airforce Service Pilots who have been trained to ferry the B-17 Flying Fortresses. World War II, 1944.

Four female pilots leaving their ship, Pistol Packin' Mama, at the four engine school at Lockbourne AAF. They are members of a group of Women Airforce Service Pilots who have been trained to ferry the B-17 Flying Fortresses. World War II, 1944.

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They are, left to right: Frances Green, Margaret (Peg) Kirchner, Ann Waldner and Blanche Osborn. The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) was a civilian women pilots' organization, whose members were United States federal civil service employees.

Over 25,000 women applied, but only 1,074 were accepted into the WASPs. The women all had prior experience and airman certificates. Of those accepted, the majority were white; aside from white women, the WASP had two Mexican American women, two Chinese American women (Hazel Ying Lee and Maggie Gee), and one Native American woman (Ola Mildred Rexroat). Due to the existing climate of racial discrimination, Mildred Hemmans Carter, the only African American applicant was asked to withdraw her application. Mildred Hemmans Carter came highly qualified, earning her BA at age 19 at Tuskegee Institute and receiving aviation certification the following year (1941). She was rejected from the opportunity to fly with the Tuskegee Airmen due to her gender and denied entry within the WASP due to her race. Seventy years later, she was retroactively recognized as a WASP and took her final flight at age 90.

Oh nice its a reference to the Bing Crosby song that's in Fallout!

Apparently the plane was shot down over Leipzig :(

Edit: apparently it probably wasn’t, and there were many planes with the name!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pistol_Packin%27_Mama

Isn’t that a Bing Crosby song?

cheerfully shoots super mutant in the face

Ruby Bridges escorted by U.S. Marshals to attend an all-white school, 1960. She was the first African-American child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana during the New Orleans school desegregation crisis.

Ruby Bridges escorted by U.S. Marshals to attend an all-white school, 1960. She was the first African-American child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana during the New Orleans school desegregation crisis.

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Bridges was one of six black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether they could go to the school. Two of the six decided to stay at their old school, Bridges went to a school by herself, and three children were transferred to McDonogh No. 19 and became known as the McDonogh Three. Bridges and her mother were escorted to school by four federal marshals during the first year Bridges attended William Frantz Elementary. Ruby's father was initially reluctant, but her mother felt strongly that the move was needed not only to give her own daughter a better education but to "take this step forward ... for all African-American children". As Bridges describes it, "Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras." Former United States Deputy Marshal Charles Burks later recalled, "She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn't whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we're all very very proud of her."

As soon as Bridges entered the school, white parents pulled their own children out; all the teachers refused to teach while a black child was enrolled. Only one person agreed to teach Ruby and that was Barbara Henry, from Boston, Massachusetts, and for over a year Henry taught her alone, "as if she were teaching a whole class."

That first day, Bridges and her adult companions spent the entire day in the principal's office; the chaos of the school prevented their moving to the classroom until the second day. On the second day, however, a white student broke the boycott and entered the school when a 34-year-old Methodist minister, Lloyd Anderson Foreman, walked his 5-year-old daughter Pam through the angry mob, saying, "I simply want the privilege of taking my child to school ..." A few days later, other white parents began bringing their children, and the protests began to subside. Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her; because of this, the U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower, who were overseeing her safety, allowed Ruby to eat only the food that she brought from home.

Child psychiatrist Robert Coles volunteered to provide counseling to Bridges during her first year at Frantz. He met with her weekly in the Bridges home, later writing a children's book, The Story of Ruby Bridges, to acquaint other children with Bridges' story.

The Bridges family suffered for their decision to send her to William Frantz Elementary: her father lost his job, the grocery store the family shopped at would no longer let them shop there, and her grandparents, who were sharecroppers in Mississippi, were turned off their land. She has noted that many others in the community, both black and white, showed support in a variety of ways. Some white families continued to send their children to Frantz despite the protests, a neighbor provided her father with a new job, and local people babysat, watched the house as protectors, and walked behind the federal marshals' car on the trips to school.

Bridges, now Ruby Bridges Hall, still lives in New Orleans with her husband, Malcolm Hall, and their four sons. After graduating from a desegregated high school, she worked as a travel agent for 15 years and later became a full-time parent. She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, which she formed in 1999 to promote "the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences". Describing the mission of the group, she says, "racism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it."

In 2014, a statue of Bridges was unveiled in the courtyard of William Frantz Elementary School.

Gosh, imagine having to be in a classroom all by yourself because no one wanted to teach you. Being escorted by bodyguards because someone might kill you. Always eating food from home because the lunch ladies at school could’ve poisoned your food.

This wasn’t even 60 years ago. Damn.

A racist.

Who threatens an elementary school kid.

A. A. Milne was born on this day in 1882. He was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh. Photo: A.A. Milne, his son Christopher Robin, and the real Winnie The Pooh, 1926.

A. A. Milne was born on this day in 1882. He was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh. Photo: A.A. Milne, his son Christopher Robin, and the real Winnie The Pooh, 1926.

Christopher Robin later came to hate the books and resented his father, believing has childhood had been exploited. He gave away the stuffed animals to the books' editor, who gave them to the New York Public Library.

“Oh no, my father wrote fictional stories with a character based on me that provided joy to millions of children and families! And all I got out of it was a stable childhood thanks to the income generated by that book. My dad is the worst.”

he did but ended up reconciling with the books, if not his father

From the article;

Writing his memoirs seemed cathartic for Christopher—"Believe it or not, I can look at those four [Winnie-the-Pooh] books without flinching," he said at age 60—but he never truly reconciled with his parents. He visited his father occasionally in the author's last years, but after A.A. Milne died, Christopher only saw his mother once in the remaining 15 years she lived past her husband's death. Even on her deathbed, according to the Oxford Biography Index, Daphne Milne refused to see her only son.

I could see how someone might feel that way if they had an absent/shitty father who made tons of money writing about their childhood but didn’t seem to care about them IRL

Try one of these subthreads