Astronomy

My image of the Trianglum Galaxy taken with a 14.5" scope

My image of the Trianglum Galaxy taken with a 14.5" scope

this is sublime, this image is better than the one i remember from the early 80s space encyclopedia.

hard to imagine this is amtuer, pls keep taking more pictures of the sky

Ever wonder what it looks like to resolve the stars in M33? Yeah, I was wondering the same thing. Luckily the 14.5" RCOS at DSW decided to satisfy my new desire to look deep deep into galaxies. This is going to be a fun go around I think. While the gear I use seems to be spiraling out of control, the one thing that also continues to remain constant with every upgrade in gear is just how important processing is. This is some of the best data I have ever worked with. This is the second image I've created on the system, the first image I did not like enough to post here. I wanted my first image with this scope to the sub to be a beauty, I think this one counts. While there are some things I am definitely unhappy with in the image, there is a lot I really do enjoy. This data actually came with a couple hours of HA frames with it, but I skipped adding those. I didn't think the data really needed, you can see how much HA was captured in the L and R frames alone in this image.

If you have any questions about this image, the gear, or DSW, feel free to ask! Also, would really enjoy some feed back on this image since it isn't something I am used to editing. It will definitely take some getting used to I think before I really get all the data is capable of out of the image.

The small, northern constellation Triangulum harbors this magnificent face-on spiral galaxy, M33. Its popular names include the Pinwheel Galaxy or just the Triangulum Galaxy. M33 is over 50,000 light-years in diameter, third largest in the Local Group of galaxies after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), and our own Milky Way. About 3 million light-years from the Milky Way, M33 is itself thought to be a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy and astronomers in these two galaxies would likely have spectacular views of each other's grand spiral star systems. As for the view from planet Earth, this sharp composite image nicely shows off M33's blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions along the galaxy's loosely wound spiral arms. In fact, the cavernous NGC 604 is the brightest star forming region, seen here at about the 4 o'clock position from the galaxy center. Like M31, M33's population of well-measured variable stars have helped make this nearby spiral a cosmic yardstick for establishing the distance scale of the Universe.

Source: APOD

Equipment:

RC Optical Systems RCOS 14.5"

SBIG STX 16803

Paramount ME

Astrodon filters

Acquisition

Luminance - 28x1200" and 30x600"

Red – 15x1200"

Green – 14x1200"

Blue – 15x1200"

Total integration time - 29 hours

Taken from the Deep Sky West Observatory in Rowe, New Mexico. A Bortle 2 site.

Processing

BPP

Combine flats, darks, and bias

R/G/B processing

Combine into RGB image Photometric Color Calibration using average spiral galaxy as white reference Masked Stretch

L processing

Deconvolution Multiscale Linear Transformation for sharpening Histogram Transformation, not masked stretch (had too little contrast in this image) LHE with modified amounts and different wavelet layers as masks

LRGB Processing

Combine L + RGB images Curves on RGB/K and along with saturation (probably like 20 iterations before I got the colors how I like them) Final slight noise reduction. This image was practically noise free, I didn't want to ruin any of the data with a noise reduction Convert to jpg

If you feel like looking at some of my other images or following me on social media, here is a shameless plug to my instagram

Trust me, I don't think I'll be stopping any time soon. In reality I'm only putting out more and more images lately. Far too much data to work through, I'm behind!

Breathtaking. It fills me with a bittersweet feeling that we will never know all of the infinite possibilities contained within this one photograph.

Jupiter in infrared

Jupiter in infrared

For those who wonder, yes, Jupiter DOSE have rings, just not as bright(or pretty) as Saturns

Does*

Since Jupiter's gaseous surface has very low reflectivity in infrared, taking photographs in that part of the spectrum reveals rings and small satellites which are undetectable in visible light due to the glare of the planet.

What does this tell us about Jupiter? (not astronomer)

The SETI Sky Map: An Astronomer's Guide to Alien Contact

The SETI Sky Map: An Astronomer's Guide to Alien Contact

What the actual fuck. Why is this upvoted?

LOL

Here is a list of threads in other subreddits about the same content:

The Andean Sky God Website on /sub/sbmarking with 1 karma (created at 2011-01-31 20:02:07 by /u/razvanm) The SETI Sky Map: An Astronomer's Guide to Alien Contact on /sub/seti with 3 karma (created at 2017-10-30 17:16:37 by /u/zeeaflams)

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Now you can remove the comment by replying delete!

He probably also needed to manipulate the orbit of Charon (and its companion Pluto) to get them into the right place at the right time for that interplanetary eclipse.

Oh. Okay. No problem then.

If you can understand!!!

If you can understand!!!

Not visible here. Too much light pollution

Light pollution :,(

200 billion? That is a bit short. I've heard a 1 trillion one will also be visible tonight.

I'm in canada and it takes at least 90 minutes to get away... looking at east US on light pollution map gives me anxiety

For the first time, Astronomers catch two neutron stars colliding which leads to gold and platinum spewing out

For the first time, Astronomers catch two neutron stars colliding which leads to gold and platinum spewing out
For the first time, Astronomers catch two neutron stars colliding which leads to gold and platinu...

Astronomer here! This is HUGE news! (TL;DR at bottom for those who just want the skinny.) There are two kinds of gravitational wave signal that LIGO can detect- colliding black holes (of which four such events have been found so far), and harder but a neutron star- neutron star (NS-NS) collision is also possible. And these are harder to detect, but the signal you get has a lot more going for it: first, no one knows for sure if black hole- black hole mergers even have any light they give off, but second the amount of sky you get from these LIGO signals if you want to do follow up is insane- you will literally get a map covering about half the sky and be told to go look. As you can imagine, that's not super useful.

NS-NS mergers, though, are different. First, we did expect them to give off electromagnetic radiation in some form- for example, there is a class of gamma ray burst (GRB), called short GRBs, which make up about 30% of all GRBs we detect but no one has said where they come from for sure but NS-NS mergers were the leading theory. It's been a mystery for decades though. Second, the map you get is way better on the sky- more like 30 square degrees (might not be perfectly remembering that number), which is still a lot of sky but nowhere near as bad as half of it if you want to find a counterpart.

So, in August, LIGO detected a gravitational wave from a NS-NS merger, and the gamma-ray telescope Fermi detected a GRB at the exact same time from that direction of sky. Moreover, it was astronomically pretty close to us- I don't remember how exactly you get distance from gravitational waves, but the point is you can and you could then make up a list of galaxies within that patch of sky within that distance for a short follow-up list. So this was way easier to track down, and everyone in August was laughing in astronomy because this was the worst kept secret of all time- all the big space telescopes have public logs, for example, when they do a "target of opportunity" it is public record. But what was found exactly was still a secret until today, and the answer is multiple telescopes picked up this signal in multiple bands, which is a kind of signal we've never seen before but some folks have literally spent decades looking for. So not only do we have the first successful follow up from a gravitational wave detector, we have solved the mystery of where GRBs come from AND witnessed a NS-NS merger for the first time ever!

On a final note, I should say that the first astronomer to discover the signal from this merger, in optical, is a colleague of mine who doesn't even normally focus on this stuff, but got lucky for doing follow up in the right place at the right time and thus gets the eternal fame and fortune. She is an awesome astronomer, plus all around good person, and it is always so lovely to see cool people succeed! :)

We are at the dawn of something new! This is an exciting place to be!

TL;DR- Not only did they discover the first ever neutron star-neutron star merger, they also did the first ever follow up in light to detect it there, and solved an enduring mystery lasting decades on where 30% of all gamma ray bursts come from. Pretty awesome day for science!

Thanks for the wonderful explanation!

Sure thing! I remember the excitement last year, so really wanted to get a post together on why people should care about this one.

press conference

This is great news! It was hinted at to us laypeople during the Rainer Weiss at MIT, after the Nobel prize was announced.

Do you think that the Nobel committee knew of this crucial discovery before announcing the prize this year?

Was a little bored so I made this

Was a little bored so I made this

Wow

I want to know what happens when you're a lot bored. That's really cool.

"A little" bored? I'd hate to see what you get up to when the internet goes out.

yeah but those hours where useless and now i got something to be proud of and gain information at the same time, way better than just buying it or looking at it online

Protect your child!!!

Protect your child!!!

Alright...that's pretty good.

Spotted on the Dank Memes Astrophysics Page- https://www.facebook.com/AstrophysicsMemes/

Run by some grad students with a great sense of humor. :)

Because it's so easy

wtf? I though bdsm was "Brown Dwarf Star Moon." I've been using it wrong to my wife this whole time. She's going to kick my ass when I get home...

Got to show off my university's meteorite collection last night, wearing my Hubble Deep Field dress!

Got to show off my university's meteorite collection last night, wearing my Hubble Deep Field dress!

We need more women in science who aren't afraid to show off their astral bodies!!

Radio astronomy AMA?

All you need is an iguana, Ms. Frizzle

Ask away!

A couple of possible reasons why we havent succeeded in finding other forms of life in space.

A couple of possible reasons why we havent succeeded in finding other forms of life in space.

I feel like "Far far away" and "A long road ahead of us" should be considered the primary reasons at the moment. We just don't have the ability to detect life at such great distances in such a short amount of time.

We just recently developed ways to detect planets. The fact that we can't see civilizations isn't even remotely surprising, which renders the other explanations very premature at the moment.

Once we've colonized a few thousand star systems, searched a healthy portion of the milky way, and still haven't found intelligent life, then it's time to invoke the other explanations. Right now it's just premature to try to explain why we haven't found other civilizations. Due to the ridiculous scale of the universe it seems pretty obvious why we haven't.

To say we've barely scratched the surface is a monumental understatement.

"To search expectantly for a radio signal from an extraterrestrial source is probably as culture-bound a presumption as to search the galaxy for a good Italian restaurant." Terence McKenna

To say we've barely scratched the surface is a monumental understatement.

One pixel in all of the pixels manufactured.

If aliens don't exist explain Alf

A 3D printed model of the solar system I'm using tonight at an outreach event! The curve the planets are sitting on is the Sun on this scale

A 3D printed model of the solar system I'm using tonight at an outreach event! The curve the planets are sitting on is the Sun on this scale

This is a great way to get perspective. Now it just needs to be smoothed out and painted!

That's really cool how the stand is also the sun. Definitely the best perspective I've ever gotten on the size of the solar system!

I would buy that

The curve being the sun is a BRILLIANT touch. I would by this in a heart beat. You should totally make them a little bigger, then sand them, and paint them (include Saturn'a polar hexagon, Jupiter's eye, etc etc). They'd kill on Etsy. Little space trinkets would be awesome gift ideas, and I've never seen them on etsy so it's an open market.

Try one of these subthreads