TIL that in Interstellar, they actually planted hundreds of acres of corn just for the sake of the movie and it ultimately costed nothing because they made all of the money back when they sold the crop

TIL that in Interstellar, they actually planted hundreds of acres of corn just for the sake of the movie and it ultimately costed nothing because they made all of the money back when they sold the crop

That's just like real farming. Spend all your money planting a crop, make it all back...

It's cool they had a designated plot specifically for shooting. I know farmers that would cringe seeing that truck zoom through a productive corn field, paid or not.

think most like to make a bit more in the end

Cost*

Edit: 1000 upvotes for this?! Double edit: thanks for gold, grammatically aware friend!

Christopher Nolan, corn farmer, massively boosted his profits with one weird trick!

That whole series of how they made Interstellar is fascinating to watch. So many aspects of the filmmaking process that could have been achieved in post was actually created in camera. Nolan is an incredible director IMO.

Why would they care if it was paid for? Most corn is just going to go sit in a silo or made into sugar.

Iowan here, I would plow under my corn to build a baseball field any day.

Not many farmers top up their income with an entertainment production.

It's a bit of a self fulfilling prophecy though.

Nolan has the budget to not do shit in post, so he doesn't and it helps make his movies incredible.

Other directors don't have the budget, do it in post & it turns out okay-ish.

He is one of the few current a list directors who can get access to absurd levels of funding and achieve their creative visions.

I'm suspicious there are a lot of other quality directors who could also do similar levels of incredible stuff if their funding and control constraints were likewise removed.

Part of the reason Nolan gets the budgets he does is because he is always on-budget, if not below. According to this Guardian article from 2014:

"Nolan’s movies have grossed more than $3.5bn worldwide, and his last four films have come in under budget. When Interstellar was finished, Nolan returned what he called a “substantial” amount of money to Paramount."

What's really important is that he gets complete creative control because of this.

PEOPLE WILL COME

Farmers hate him!

Was the tesseract expensive or were they able to recoup their cost on that too?

This is called farming and a lot of people in America regularly do this as a professional job.

You may as well delete this post OP and move interstate. We are all embarrassed for you

Unfortunately, 5th dimensional beings have no use for our money so we cant really pay them with that.

That's pretty incredible. I wonder how he does it. It could be he asks for alot more than he needs.

Everyone else just keeps everything or finds a way to 'spend' it.

If you build it, nerds will come

They'd like to, doesn't always work like that. You can plant 100,000 veggies at 50 cents market value in April, and come fall, after taking out the rotted, under-grown, rodent-chewed veggies, you're left with 80,000 that now went down to 40 cents per. Then there's fuel, water, manure/fertilizer and farmhand costs. Farming is one of the hardest, most thankless, jobs with a low return on investment. Only way you can make it big is to have a huge farm with a supermarket/brand contract. I.e. smuckers grapes, tropicana oranges, frito-lays potatoes.

if by livestock you mean chevys and buicks, yeah. Most corn is turned into ethanol (40% of it) and next is animal feed (36%).

I feel like you're judging my diet, which is the last thing I'd expect from someone who eats pennies.

I wonder if when the director told the production crew "we need a great plot", he was talking about storylines?

Nolan financed his first film, Following, out of his salary at the time. He rehearsed the scenes massively so they could be shot in one or two takes on 16mm stock. He wrote, directed, shot, edited and produced himself on evenings and weekends. He's earned all the backing he got after that I think.

That's pretty much what mudding is, finding a mud hole and driving through it and drifting. It's literally the reason most people lift their trucks.. just saying.

There are plenty of good movies with shoestring budgets. Audiences have proven over and over that a good, well-told story is more important than an expensive effect.

Like when Family Guy did Return of the Jedi and had that animated elephant dance across the screen while the credits said how much it cost to animate.

I wonder how many just throw a huge party at the end and write it off as catering.

First NASA wanted Kubrick to fake the lunar landings but once they figured out it was more expensive to make the set like he wanted it, they decided to shoot on location.

I should make movies in cornfields...

That's why futures contracts exist. Almost no farmer (bigger than 100 acres) sells all their crop at market right when it's ready. They "store" it in an elevator and sell it when the price is right for them. Some farmers even sell contracts (i.e. I'll sell you 200 bushel for $x.xx at this date in the future) before they've even finished planting it!

The decision to use majority practical effects over CGI and the careful planning of executing that and combining the two together.

Here is one such example:

"The anxiety about the economics of a film is crushing," says Nolan, who believes there are ways to alleviate pressure from studios. "I chose to always be on or ahead of schedule and on or ahead of budget."

One example of his punctual production was the opening airplane sequence of The Dark Knight Rises, which Nolan said was the sequence he was most proud of in any of his films. Nolan explained the shots were the result of months of planning that culminated in two days of shooting, even though they had scheduled it for five.

"Priced" would be the American word of choice.

I drove by some kids joy riding in an already-harvested cornfield last night. Gotta get mud on their lifted trucks somehow.

all over their keyboards

Good farmers are actually quite clever, in my experience. They're not always the most educated, but they're far from stupid. Media (as in movies, shows, etc.) just kind of pushes the "innocent stupid farmer" thing way too hard.

Coming from a farmer... If you see someone obviously trespassing in a vehicle, call law enforcement, please? They can do a lot of damage to drainage on a field that can take a lot of time to fix. Think of it this way.. if you saw the same truck or even an aTV doing donuts in a front yard in your neighborhood, wouldnt you call or in?

Hell, most of the time you can watch a crop get hailed out, collect the insurance, and still be ok. Better than 100 years ago when if your crops failed your family died in the winter.

I will come

It's weird how your large farmers are probably better money managers than your average guy at Morgan Stanley / Fidelity / etc. Farmers have to know how to hedge, manage futures, etc. I couldn't imagine doing that as a software programmer as part of my day job. "Look, I'll sell you 50 lines of code for $100 six months from now... "

58000 Dollars for a few seconds of elephants.

Here it is:

For every driven nights-and-weekends dreamer like that, who eventually sees success, I feel like there's 50 (or 500?) others who fail in silence. Luck & timing have a lot to do with recognition.

Disclaimer: I may be projecting, as a moonlighting musician/producer.

We had to pay them by living in the darkest of all possible timelines available to us. However, interstellar was a pretty good movie so we got that out of the deal, other timelines had Gladiator 2, which did well commercially but certainly was not as thought provoking.

If you film it...

No way dude

Notably "costed" is a word but it refers specifically to setting the price of something. As an example: "The new manager costed milk to $2 last week so that's what it cost me when I bought it yesterday". It's more common in British English than American English, where a word like "valued" is more likely to be used.

A cornfield isn't a mud hole, though. Mudding is fun as shit but you're still responsible for being a decent enough person to not fuck up someone else's property, especially farmers' fields.

They probably feel the same way about us: "Stupid, innocent city person is scared of a spider, can't kill a chicken, and doesn't know the difference between a weed and a carrot."

It's cool they had a designated plot specifically for shooting.

Yes, from what I've heard the success of most movies is dependant on a good plot.

A scene which will be remembered forever... for the Bane and CIA agent meme

cough he's also from a wealthy well connected family of brits cough

Most is not made into sugar. Most is fed to livestock.

It is!! Until you get stuck, then it turns into everyone getting covered while pushing and spinning the tires.. which is still kinda fun haha

Move interstellar

costed

Whenever I see this typo the voice in my head suddenly changes to the voice of Tommy Pickles.

Nsfw link

No, it's Iowa.

Real fuckin big gardens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaZuBziWLgk

Relevant Webb and Mitchell Mitchell and Webb:

It's amazing to me the disrespect some people have for farmland, as if it's somehow public property. When I was baling my hay field next to a road recently I saw a truck stop maybe 200 feet in front of me after they passed me, get out, toss the trash from their vehicle into our fields on both sides of the road, then carry on as if nothing happened as I tried to catch them with my tractor and baler before they left. I've spent hours cleaning out garbage next to the road in our fields because if I don't then some horse is going to eat it in a bale down the line.

Nope. Maybe they paid a grad student $5,800 and made their week, but that's not $58k worth of Animation.

Edit: It's a loop that's like, 0.5 seconds. That's 12 frames of TV, or 6 frames of animation. The model was stupid simple, so one of their technicians probably watched a YouTube tutorial or just asked a friend to show them how. One model, 6 different poses that weren't professionally pieced together, no motion blur or anything else.. yeah. That $58k they wrote off to the producer probably bought someone a whole lot of alcohol.

First year farmer here: shitting my pants right now actually.

There's no way this actually cost 58000$. I lost my shit when I saw it zoom across the video

Is this heaven?

It's even better when you spend all your money and all your time and lose money.

finding a mud hole and driving through it and drifting.

Sounds like fun!

It had a production budget of 165m, which is a lot but still way less than a lot of tentpole films which cost 200-300m to make and use mainly CGI.

He values physical effects over CGI because it gets better acting out of the actors (they arent just reacting to nothing on a green screen) and the films will age better as you can go back and watch many films from 10-20 years ago that now look bad in certain scenes because the CGI isn't perfect.

the government discussion about it

Did they really use Matt Damon's poo?

Most people lift their trucks for the sole purpose of having lifted trucks. I'd gladly wager that far less than half, if not less than a quarter, of the people who lift their trucks actually do anything with their truck that necessitates the lift.

Hundreds of years ago? Still happens in places..

First year not farming. I'm in IT now. Miss working in the land and being outdoors but oh well. Couldn't afford to not have money. Good luck buddy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A7bq1HFygs

Hey, do you want to make a bit of money, you should do what I did...

Corn....cornsumers?

Largely practical effects.

Nolan has the budget to not do shit in post, so he doesn't and it helps make his movies incredible.

Since I'm OP, I feel I have the right to repost my own comment on this one from another thread.

The reason why he is gets big budgets and he doesn't use CGI as much as others is actually because it saves money and because he always comes in under budget.

This is one of my favorite articles about Christopher Nolan if anyone is interested. This was written during the build-up to Interstellar before its release. On the topic of budget and control, here are some relevant excerpts:

Like Spielberg and James Cameron before him, Nolan is one of only a handful of film-makers who can walk into a studio with an idea and exit with $200m to make it. Nolan’s movies have grossed more than $3.5bn worldwide, and his last four films [The Prestige, The Dark Knight, Inception, The Dark Knight Rises] have come in under budget. When Interstellar was finished, Nolan returned what he called a “substantial” amount of money to Paramount.

“What he realised very early on was that the moment you give the studios an excuse to come in, you’ve lost it,” said Emma Thomas, Nolan’s wife and co-producer, who first met him when he was a student at University College London – studying English but spending all his spare time in the basement of the Bloomsbury theatre, hunched over the college’s Steenbeck editing suite, piecing together his first low-budget shorts. “We watched it happen,” Thomas said. “The moment you go over budget, you’ve lost the creative control than an obsessive director like Chris needs. He’s always been extremely strategic about it.”

It's not specifically talked about in this article, I can't find the original article in which he does talk about it, but large scale CGI is incredibly expensive in comparison to using props and practical effects. You guys know T.A.R.S. and C.A.S.E., the box robots from Interstellar right? (Thank you /u/Aarenas52 for the video. As a side note, it really shows the due diligence and preparation that Nolan and other good directors put into their movies during the pre-production and not try to do during filming or post production.) Far far cheaper to use special effects to paint out someone in the background than it is to pay a company to render a full sequence of CGI shots that won't be ready for review for months on end. Anyone see the Overwatch shorts that Blizzard puts out now and again? That quality of CGI costs approximately $1 million per finished minute. So simply by choosing to do a practical effect and supplementing that with careful planning, you can save a lot of money. To quote another article:

"The anxiety about the economics of a film is crushing," says Nolan, who believes there are ways to alleviate pressure from studios. "I chose to always be on or ahead of schedule and on or ahead of budget."

One example of his punctual production was the opening airplane sequence of The Dark Knight Rises, which Nolan said was the sequence he was most proud of in any of his films. Nolan explained the shots were the result of months of planning that culminated in two days of shooting, even though they had scheduled it for five.

With practical effects you can do something like this. You can do something that was supposed to take 5 days and cut it down to 2. And that saves money. To get back to my original point I'll use one last quote from Nolan:

"I do think right now it's difficult for original films to get made," Nolan said, alluding to Hollywood's penchant for producing entities with built-in audiences through sequels, comic book remakes and book adaptations. Where it was once possible to bank on a star consistently pulling in crowds movie after movie, Nolan pointed out that is no longer that case: "It's hard to base a film around casting - there are no commercial guarantees."

There's no guarantee of commercial success or profit when making a movie. Any one of a hundred things could mess it up. But something that Christopher Nolan does that makes the studio trust him with their money, something he does to control them instead of the other way around, is he comes in under budget. With that, he is giving them at least one guarantee: He will save them money even if he doesn't turn them a profit. So that is why he is one of the few directors that is given freedom to do what he wants with a large budget.

His specific views on CGI in movies are also outlined in this quote:

“The thing with computer-generated imagery is that it’s an incredibly powerful tool for making better visual effects. But I believe in an absolute difference between animation and photography. However sophisticated your computer-generated imagery is, if it’s been created from no physical elements and you haven’t shot anything, it’s going to feel like animation. There are usually two different goals in a visual effects movie. One is to fool the audience into seeing something seamless, and that’s how I try to use it. The other is to impress the audience with the amount of money spent on the spectacle of the visual effect, and that, I have no interest in. We try to enhance our stunt work and floor effects with extraordinary CGI tools like wire and rig removals. If you put a lot of time and effort into matching your original film elements, the kind of enhancements you can put into the frames can really trick the eye, offering results far beyond what was possible 20 years ago. The problem for me is if you don’t first shoot something with the camera on which to base the shot, the visual effect is going to stick out if the film you’re making has a realistic style or patina. I prefer films that feel more like real life, so any CGI has to be very carefully handled to fit into that.”

If you watch much of the other related videos (all taken from the special features of the Blu-Ray copy of the movie), you'll get to see exactly what in Interstellar he used CGI for and what he used practical effects for and how he combined them. It's absolutely fascinating. Even the full CGI shots, I think one of the only ones in the movie is of the black hole, Gargantua and that in itself is a very special CGI because they just took the physics equations for a black hole and plugged them into the software to get an accurate simulation of how light responds to a black hole. That supposedly allowed new insights in astrophysics research on the subject.

I feel like you're speaking ill of Scorpion King 3, and that's unacceptable. CGIRock is a beautiful machination.

www.cornhub.com is currently up for sale for $365,000.... I feel there may be a few corn puns all around the internet.

Different movie.

I would pay to see that in a theatre

His online self buyed the farm.

I haven't lived a ton of places, but the people in Iowa were some of the nicest I have ever met. And very inclusive.

But there ain't shit to do there

Almost certainly. Plan out everything in advance, then ask for a budget with a significant margin, then hunt for ways to make it cheaper still.

The Chev got stuck, and the Ford got stuck, got the Chev unstuck when the Dodge showed up, but the Dodge got stuck in the tractor rut which eventually pulled out the Ford.

Key and Peele?

edit: yep

Key and Peele?

edit:

To add, if you have money you can also afford to take risks, and taking risks is where you find most of the big rewards

For you.

Iowa. You could do worse.

I thought they burned it all down? Damn CGI got me again!

That's probably why he is famous.

If you come from money, you are almost guaranteed to have money. Even if you are self made, having capita to start with is what brings you forward.

I mean, if we were to compare the amount of self made people in the biggest industries today, we would probably see that most came from wealth.

WTF? Jerry and Ben? The Bandit and Smokey? Luigi and Mario? Robin and Batman? Cheese and Macaroni?

Webb and Mitchell?

WHERE ARE YOU FROM!? WHO TAUGHT YOU TO SAY THAT!?

and mice, because mice matter too

Yes it's true. You too can grow an entire field full of grain and manage to break even.

Corn consumers hate him!

I feel your pain. Dealing with trespassers is the worst part of farming. I hate it. I don't like being a jerk to people but it's really hard not to, because when you catch someone out there you don't know if it was the first time they've ever done it or if they're the person that's done it a thousand times and it's just the first time you've caught them. People are usually dumb enough to leave mail in their trash that they dump on my fields and roads, so when I'm cleaning it up(yes, I'm the faceless person that cleans up trash that gets dumped in my fields) I just take photos and give them to the sheriff and they usually get a ticket for littering.

It also helps that he's earned the right to be given so much money for his films due to his previous movies. I'm sure Nolan would still be making great films with lower budgets if he was forced to, but obviously he can make movies that he otherwise wouldn't be able to without a large budget because the studios expect his films to do well.

It's very impressive. In software engineering, projects often go overbudget and overtime because it's incredibly hard to predict where the problems will be.

Examples: shipping of a required component is delayed, people getting sick or leaving the company, a small piece of software that doesn't work as you expected, requirements change or misinterpretation, and the list goes on and on.

Well tbf I have done that on my farm before. Impromptu demo derby. Took me hours to fix the field but it was definitely worth it.

Absolutely this. The farmer's I've known are some of the most clever people I know, and they are among the hardest working when it's time to plant and harvest. I have massive respect for farmers and their families.

Shucks that's a lot of money!

She poured gasoline on it, and only a small part burned. Her brother returned only 10 minutes later, fire extinguished.

this is where they explain that they sold the corn to make the money back.

The time stamp I linked was at the beginning of when they start talking about planting the corn.

But if you're too impatient for the second part,