Sunlight through a tree during an eclipse

Sunlight through a tree during an eclipse

The tiny holes between the leafs work like pinhole cameras projecting images of the sun. Normally they are round and just blend together, but when there is an eclipse they aren't round anymore.

I... Don't understand how the sun being partially blocked would change the shadows that a tree casts.

Who's the dipshit building attack-speed Soraka?

Best explanation out of the 3 I was given.

I see you're not a fan of "sun is not round but like covered up so you get funny little banana shadows everywhere lol". I really liked that one.

sun is not round but like covered up so you get funny little banana shadows everywhere lol

Eclipses do funky things to shadows:

https://imagicreation.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/eclipse-shadow-on-tree.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/Eclipse_Shadows.jpg

http://www.artifacting.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/IMAG0189.jpg

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01559/india-shadow_1559765i.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/LTCcQ.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Jack_and_solar_eclipse_shadows_throw_the_doorway_blinds.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/7dPJfer.jpg

Here's an excellent explanation from NASA:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/30may_solareclipse2/


"Solar images formed by pinholes, crossed fingers, patches between leaves, all occur because of diffraction--a wave property of light. In the case of a pinhole, the light rays do not shoot straight by the rim of the hole, but bend around the edge. This wave effect creates a diffraction pattern of rings on the screen which resembles a bull's eye. That's for a flat wave single light source. If the aperture is illuminated by a scene, it acts as a lens to image the scene on a screen. With the right size hole relative to the right distance to a screen, a clear image is formed. That's the general principle of a pinhole camera."

"Applying this to an eclipse observation, the sun becomes the object to view. Point the pinhole camera at the sun and you see a solar image (projected on a screen) dim enough your eyes can enjoy."

"But the pinhole effect doesn't need a designed aperture. The solar image can be formed by any aperture if the shadow is the right distance away. The sunrays though tree leaves work to make a solar image on the ground below. Blinds on the window will covert a square opening into a round sun on the wall."

"The marvel is that diffraction doesn't need a round hole to form an image. A square pinhole will also work if its area is the same. Even for a random edged shape, the wave bending will average out to form an image of the scene contained in the incident light. That's why the spots of light through the trees are round; the gaps in the foliage are imaging the sun. "

Eclipses do funky things to shadows:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/Eclipse_Shadows.jpg

http://www.artifacting.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/IMAG0189.jpg

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01559/india-shadow_1559765i.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/LTCcQ.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Jack_and_solar_eclipse_shadows_throw_the_door...

http://i.imgur.com/7dPJfer.jpg

Here's an excellent explanation from NASA:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/30may_solareclipse2/

"Solar images formed by pinholes, crossed fingers, patches between leaves, all occur because of diffraction--a wave property of light. In the case of a pinhole, the light rays do not shoot straight by the rim of the hole, but bend around the edge. This wave effect creates a diffraction pattern of rings on the screen which resembles a bull's eye. That's for a flat wave single light source. If the aperture is illuminated by a scene, it acts as a lens to image the scene on a screen. With the right size hole relative to the right distance to a screen, a clear image is formed. That's the general principle of a pinhole camera."

"Applying this to an eclipse observation, the sun becomes the object to view. Point the pinhole camera at the sun and you see a solar image (projected on a screen) dim enough your eyes can enjoy."

"But the pinhole effect doesn't need a designed aperture. The solar image can be formed by any aperture if the shadow is the right distance away. The sunrays though tree leaves work to make a solar image on the ground below. Blinds on the window will covert a square opening into a round sun on the wall."

"The marvel is that diffraction doesn't need a round hole to form an image. A square pinhole will also work if its area is the same. Even for a random edged shape, the wave bending will average out to form an image of the scene contained in the incident light. That's why the spots of light through the trees are round; the gaps in the foliage are imaging the sun. "

I took during the last eclipse here. Nobody liked my reddit post, but I thought it was neat.

I AM the chosen one!

http://imgur.com/JAtQCYI

I AM the chosen one!

TIL: When there is an eclipse, the Sun turns shadows into bananas.

That's an amazing shot! The tree leaves act similar to how pinhole cameras work, leaving these little eclipse casts

That's an amazing shot! The tree leaves act similar to how pinhole cameras work,

Oh sure, that explains everything.

Oh sure,

For those doubting, it works like this.

For those doubting, it

i made this for u moon and sun

science!!!!

i made this for u

science!!!!

Nobody ever expects the banana...

What's that object blocking the sun I wonder?

Go see for yourself during the next eclipse near you.

Or you're a cat from Sailor Moon.

They always cast the shadows...people just don't notice a symmetrical shape. Last eclipse, I noticed that the vertical slots in the window blinds by my desk were at the perfect angle to cast a row of vertical eclipses on a nearby column (sharp enough to see a sunspot!). As the eclipse ended the images remained, but just a circles. If I hadn't seen that, I would have just assumed the circles were being cast from the shape of the slots in the blinds, and not, in fact, a focused image of the sun.

This guy. Think about all of the cameras pointed up at the moon when this was taken, and this smart guy is facing the opposite way.

I don't know how that was down-voted. Got a laugh out of meme.

For all the folks asking you to wait for the next eclipse, you don't have to. If you live on a leafy tree-lined street which now has LED street lights, take a walk at night, and the street lights shining through the leaves will cast similar "pin-hole camera" style bright images....Except that the shadows will be shaped like the rows of LEDs in the street-light instead of tiny sun crescents! It's pretty cool to observe.

The last time a total eclipse happened in my area, I was 7 or 8. We were in school and we all went out with our two pieces of paper to see the pinhole effect. I was a hyper kid and my teacher hated me so as soon I started to get the least bit out of hand she sent me to sit on the curb in the shade and miss the eclipse. I was super bummed seeing as how I really liked science stuff. As I sat there I started to notice all the shadows changing around me. It was like millions of little pinhole eclipses all around me. All of the rest of the class was out in the parking lot with their shitty paper pinholes but I had my own personal light show. It was cool as shit. Thanks for bringing back that memory OP.