Guy corrects correct grammar incorrectly, gets called out.

Guy corrects correct grammar incorrectly, gets called out.

Rarely is the question asked, "But is our children learning?"

Normally when I see these the "correcter" is maybe technically correct but is being super pedantic. But this just isn't even close - how can you be so confident that you correct someone, but be so wrong?

Rarely, is the question; asked? 'Is our, children learning,

Wait, I feel like the first comma is right and the semicolon is wrong. "I am an English Teacher" and "I would like to say "Thank you for teaching my students about English"" are both independent clauses, which should be connected with a comma and a coordinating conjunction.

The first comma is correct. It doesn't matter how short the clauses are. If you go strictly by the book, a comma is always used to connect two independent clauses with a coordinating conjunction.

Basically what we have here is someone correcting the op with a half-correct correction, and someone else calling him out for it but getting half correct. Someone needs to call out the call-outer for his calling out of the callout.

And now I'm confused.

Edit: Typos!

What about the 30 people that upvoted them though...

I think that annoys me more than the 1 person being an idiot.

Rare;ly is the:question, asked, , “Is ‘our children’ larning;,?’

Grammar Nazi got Grammar Allied Forces.

This is something I see reddit being guilty of all the time. The first person to respond can frequently determine the tone of the rest of the responses. People are prone to suggestion.

Anecdotally, I talked about a personal experience awhile back, someone accused me of lying (I was being truthful) and then after I had been downvoted to oblivion someone had the gall to call me a 'piece of shit' for being a liar. This was in spite of the fact there was no evidence either way that I was telling the truth or not, and that we were, ultimately, talking about something entirely fictional anyways.

Syntax error on line 1: kill me now

I; never know how to properly use a semicolon.

Yep. People always take the first "correction" as gospel on Reddit, when often it's someone more clueless than whoever they replied to.

"Educational" comments are often just the first Google result regurgitated into a comment. People have entire back-and-forth debates about something they had no prior knowledge of, using Wikipedia as their only source. It's insane.

Being wrong is often directly related to being confident.

Wrong

me ne;ther.

In a nutshell, the easy way to remember is this:

If you have a compound sentence (2 or more clauses), take away the coordinating conjunction (and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet) , and stick a period on the end of both clauses. If both 'bits' can function as complete sentences, you're good. If one bit sounds weird, you do not need the comma. For example:

I walked to the store and got a discount bag of poops.

remove the 'and' and stick in the periods:

I walked to the store. Got a discount bag of poops.

The second sentence is incorrect grammatically as its own sentence in formal, so you must not join with a comma.

Example 2:

Billy ate the seal raw, but Charlese threw up.

Do the same:

Billy ate the seal raw. Charlese threw up.

Use dat comma.

There are a TON more rules. For one, use a comma after a dependant clause that starts a sentence, or use a comma after an interjection, or use a comma as seperators for lists (as I am doing now). However, a comma is never ever used to indicate 'taking a breath' in a sentence, nor is it used 'because it looks better'. Grammar is a set of rules, not a set of feelings.

The Cambridge book of grammar, which is my preferred reference guide, is like a thousand pages long and is very confusing.

Mind you these rules are the formal 'real rules' and sometimes on the net it can slide a bit. That said, this op is dumb because everyone's a little wrong and I don't know where to direct my cringe.

Hope this helped!

Isn't he right about a comma though?

Grammar Counter Terrorists Win

Yup.

I am an English teacher, and I would like to say, "Thank you for teaching my students about English."

Or even better:

I am an English teacher, and I would like to thank you for teaching my students about English.

Edit the screenshot and correct everyone!

They is,

Thanks for the tip; I'm allergic to pizza.

Rly da ? askin our are chitlins lrnenen

The dude correcting at the bottom shouldn’t have used a comma before the word “because”.

Or even more better: I am an English teacher and would like to thank you for teaching my students about English.

Or bestest: I am Falkor the good luck dragon and would like your mean students to jump into a dumpster.

My favorite has to be “my sloppy Google search for your subject yielded nothing, therefore you’re making all of this up.”

Relevant username

R:Ar;.e,l.;.y I?s; tH-e qu?e;:S.t..io::n., a,,sK.,,eD;

H.e:; com::'eS?

The corrector-corrector is wrong.

NEW

READY.

SYS64738

You can use a semicolon in a case where you would have one full thought on each side of the semicolon, but they are related, so the semicolon joins the thoughts.

There was a thread in /sub/soccer where they were evacuating people stand by stand. So, I suggested it might be because of a bomb and they don't want to cause panic and that controlled explosion was also possible. Then some dumbass parroted about how the city is capable of handling such evacuation and how stadium wouldn't be built without such things in place bla bla bla. I was down -180 and the idiot was up 300 in an hour. The news came shortly saying there was a bomb suspected and they were preparing for controlled explosion. I fucking swear.

I'm ordering pizza; please don't forget to clean my car.

Am I doing it right

yes

I was a copy editor. I don't copy edit anymore, but I agree with you. The comma is correct. The semicolon is very incorrect. It's really a particularly shitty use of a semicolon.

This is the holy grail. Even the second corrector has two comma splices in his sentences.

What, a; idiot

blows my mind that no one realizes it's a troll.

lo;l

/sub/surrealmemes ?

So do.

I dunno, I think I prefer the guys that are 100% confident that what they are stating is absolute indisputable fact, and when challenged for any evidence whatsoever, their only response is "google it."

Mostly because at that point you know for a fact that if you google it you're going to find nothing but the opinion articles they're parroting with no actual factual basis provided anywhere.

Same thing happened to me recently. When I defended myself I was basically told that’s what a liar would say. And that just proves it.

People. Just the worst.

Excellent breakdown, now let’s introduce our Portuguese friend to The Oxford Comma!

I dont think people even use google/wikipedia half the time. It's usually just "I heard it a few times growing up so it must be true."

If you can replace a semi colon with the line ", that is to say," and the sentence makes sense, then it's correct use of a semi colon.

I'm hungry; I haven't eaten today.

I'm hungry, that is to say, I haven't eaten today.

get it?

Dunning–Kruger effect

In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein people of low ability suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their cognitive ability as greater than it is. The cognitive bias of illusory superiority derives from the metacognitive inability of low-ability persons to recognize their own ineptitude.

:(

Rarely asked it is. Our children, learning are they? Hmmmm.

See :) But you would use it like that if we were talking about pizza beforehand :P

Not quite, ":" isn't technically used here because the first half isn't a full phrase on its own. It's:

I am an English teacher and I would like to say something: "Thank you for teaching my students about English."

Or

I am an English teacher and I would like to say, "thank you for teaching my students about English."

Or

I am an English teacher and I would like to say, "thank you for teaching my students about English."

Or

I am an English teacher and I would like to thank you for teaching my students about English.

Or

I am an English teacher and I would like to say thank you for teaching my students about English.

Or

"I am an English teacher and I would like to say, "thank you for teaching my students about English."

One source:

Following a form of to say, however, you'll almost always need a comma:

My father always said, "Be careful what you wish for."

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/marks/quotation.htm

All aboard the karma/comma train!

Yes, I responded to a comment the other day which said something to the effect of, "People are always believing what they hear, they never do their own research. It's not that hard to do a 5 second google search".

As if googling something and glancing at the top results is the same as actually researching a complex issue.

Okay, so if I got this one right, it means that a comma should always come before an "and" if the and it connecting two independent sentences?

I'm particularly curious about this because in Portuguese a comma should NEVER come before an "and" if you're connecting two sentences.

I never actually knew it worked like that in English. I wonder how many different rules there are.

Fuck you. I hate you.

R,a,r,e,l,y; i,s t,h,e q;u,e,s,t,i,o,n a,s,k.e'd,?!:; "B-u:t i,s o;u?r C,hil;dre,n lea-rnin;g?"*

Second option bias is pretty big on Reddit.

People also apparently love fighting over semantics to the point where they'll argue correcting someone's use of a word isn't a semantics argument because semantics.

Literally, here's a link.

https://np.reddit.com/sub/trashy/comments/7dhub8/good_to_know_my_high_school_hasnt_gone_downhill/...

It's so fuckin' stupid

Yes! I like how you used the phrase ; to make it easier to understand

It makes sense now!

Yes!

They don't think like they bee, but they doo.

This is why /sub/askhistorians has such strict rules. If it didn't, there would be an absolute epidemic of completely incorrect answers with upvotes in the thousands.

Ya, it's a comma splice.

In school I learned that you can often use a ";" to replace ", and" as long as the two thoughts are related. For example:

I love mashed potatoes, and yams are pretty good too.

I love mashed potatoes; yams are pretty good too.

I think the first sentence sounds more natural, but I believe the second is grammatically sound.

*chirren

I subscribe to the Cambridge Double-inverted Whammerflange myself.

If they’re semi-short phrases that are connected better without a comma, a comma is sometimes not needed. The comma placement is fine though

I'm still puzzled why you don't need a comma after the first clause. In my mind, it would be:

I am an English teacher, and I would like to...

Or

I am an English teacher and would like to...

The comma is used because the subsequent clause contains a subject. The second one doesn't use a comma because "would like to" is still using the original subject.

The first comma is only necessary if you use "I" twice.

I am an English teacher, and I would like to say, "Thank you for teaching my students about English."

This works because each clause has a subject:

"I am an English teacher."

"I would like to say."

If you removed the second "I", you would not use the comma because the clauses would have a shared subject:

"I am an English teacher and would like to say"

Language is fun sometimes :D

So, I am an English teacher and I would like to say: "thank you for teaching my students about English."

;ol*

I love semicolons; I use them profusely.

Rarely is the question asked, 'But can our children read good and do other things good too?"

All aboard, the karma/comma, train!

- Christopher Walken

King, of the Clauses.

Grammar Kursk'd

8===D

D;efini,tely"

Donalding-Trumper effect

Bestester: I teach English. Thank you.

Why would he care what a lamp post thinks?

Where's u/commahorror when you need him?

I'm Ron Burgundy?

What's the bullshit? This just looks like your everyday stupid.

OBJECTION

Settle down, Cam

Since both verbs have a subject, they are independent clauses and should be separated by a comma. If the "I" weren't repeated, it would have been a compound predicate, and then there shouldn't be a comma.

I feel like a comma is needed in this case. Commas also tend to go where there is a natural pause in speaking, and no pause in the sentence makes it feel hurried.

Shouldn't there still be a comma after the word teacher? Those are two independent clauses. Removing the second pronoun seems to be the best thing.

I am an English teacher and would like...

and that we were, ultimately, talking about something entirely fictional anyways.

So you are a piece of shit liar!

Okay, so if I got this one right, it means that a comma should always come before an "and" if the and it connecting two independent sentences?

Correct.

In this case, the two independent clauses are:

"I am an English teacher." "I would like to say thank you for teaching my students about English."

Both sentences can stand alone, but the word "and" joins them into a complete thought.

Wait. If you're a liar and you say you're a liar... what does it have to do with net neutrality?

Use them to join very related sentences.

I hate sand; it's coarse and irritating, and it gets everyway.

(That's a legit example)

They also have a secondary use when subclausing lists, but that's more complicated. If you want a simple way to be sure of their use, the above is right.

How can children be real if they learning isn’t real?

Wait you're the guy who spelt his username wrong to Obama!

And also you didn't use it correctly. I should've mentioned it but both clauses need to make sense alone. "To make it easier to understand" isn't a complete sentence, so a semi colon doesn't fit.

Try:

I like how you used the phrase; you made it easier to understand.

Both clauses are complete sentences alone.

If I'm being honest, every time I have used a semi colon it's been a complete shot in the dark.

OMG the memories

Maybe he intended to use a colon and typoed it?

Lot's of student's doesn't know how to even read they're report card's so I don't think there teacher's are learning them right.

This is something I see reddit being guilty of all the time.

This happens so often in the science subs. Say something vaguely contrarian but technical sounding in an authoritative tone and let the upvotes flow.

You’re correct.

Muphry’s Law at work.

Could I say it like this:

I am an English teacher and I would like to say, "thank you." (For teaching my kids English.)

I imagine that last part muttered under one's breath.

Maybe?