Bodies of 7 missing U.S. sailors found in damaged USS Fitzgerald

Bodies of 7 missing U.S. sailors found in damaged USS Fitzgerald
Bodies of 7 missing U.S. sailors found in damaged USS Fitzgerald

I don't know how to feel. I scrolled through updates all day hoping to find my brother was found. I finally get one and reports say several of them were found and flown to a hospital. I was crying of happiness at the thought of my brother being one of them, only to find out all seven are dead. From one family to another, I sincerely hope we all get through this.

Edit: Thank you for the messages everyone. He was proud to be in the Navy and to serve his country. He'll always be my best friend and beloved brother. Rest in peace.

Edit 2: I actually just got word from another shipmate that was on board the USS Fitzgerald as well. He said that the cargo ship did not appear on the radar and the lights were dim. They tried to turn, but by then it was too late. When they hit, the berthing rooms started to flood. They sealed off all the berthing rooms, essentially trapping the sailors because they thought no one was in any of the rooms to avoid sinking the ship.

Edit 3: Thank you again everyone for the thoughts and wishes. I ask you all to reassure your deployed children, siblings, or parents that you love them, as I regretably never got the chance to. I will respond back to some more questions to the best of my ability later in the morning if there are any more.

As an ex Navy guy this really depresses me. I imagine they got stuck in a sealed off compartment. That ship got smacked hard. I feel so bad for the families.

Insane that this happened. Navy Ships have multiple people in the pilot house, lookouts all over the ship, people in CIC monitoring surface contacts, and it's a giant ship with lights that they hit.

HOW did this happen? This has to be the worst officer of the deck of all time.

Edit: I agree that it looks like the navy ship got hit. But that doesn't equal an excuse for the more maneuverable military vessel getting hit by ANYTHING. It's literally every persons job standing watch to ensure nothing gets too close to the ship. From the looks of it, the OOD made a terrible decision, and got people killed and ruined his commanding officers career. I can't imagine he's loving life right now. OODs get shit when they just happen to get a few hundred ft from another ship. Like straight up fired and never stand that watch again. You can tell when it happens too. The ship will take a hard unexpected turn. Next thing you know ensign fuck up is in engineering department.

I've seen an OOD get his ass chewed out just because he was pointed at the carrier. The carrier was a few miles away. But this is how insanely strict ocean navigation is.

OOD = officer of the deck. Guy driving the ship.

Former Marine that's been on 2 MEU's: always scared in the back of my mind waking up to water flooding the berthing and not knowing where to go or what to do. I hope they passed quickly.

3 months on the Ponce in 2011 and 9 months on the New York in 2012.

Also, we spent a lot of time at sea, but also some time on land training in places like Morocco, Djibouti,Kuwait, and Jordan, doing our actual jobs. No two days at sea were the same, but it usually went something like this.

Wake up

Eat

Stand watch (either on the LCAC guarding the trucks or with a sailor topside on one of the .50's) for 4 hours

Clean my weapon

Eat

Work out

Jerk off

Find an MRE eat

Jerk off again

Dinner time

Stand another watch for 4 hours

Jerk off a final time

Read a book/watch one of the 100's of pirated movies I've already watched/listen to music

Sleep

Wake up and repeat.

Once in awhile, we would have range time topside. Also we would alternate ships tax for 2 weeks, unless you were a douchebag and then you'd find yourself there more often. For example, my first two weeks on the Ponce was in the pulper room. The guys in the plastics room were throwing shit overboard when we threw our trash over at night and I said, "that's fucked up, I thought it was only supposed to be food and crushed metal." So because I cared so much about the ocean, I got to do another two week tour in the plastics room. The next year, on the New York, I spent about 2 weeks serving food. I found that, in that position, the people that were assholes were generally less assholish when you were scooping food on their plate. Whenever I'd get bored and my platoon needed another "tribute" to the Ships Tax Games, I would volunteer to break up the monotony and get away from a berthing of Marines that have nothing to do but eat, sleep, work out, jerk off, and try their hardest not to get in trouble all day.

Hands down my favorite day was crossing the equator on the New York. The Marine Corps and Navy have different definitions of hazing, but it was a cool experience to get yelled at by sailors and have the ship turned into a mini-obstacle course.

Edit: Gold cherry popped from a post about my masturbation routine. Mother would be proud.

Addressed to u/FuckYouWithAloha, not the 7 sailors who died.

Did they not train you on any emergency procedures? During emergencies the 1MC will call General Quarters and there will be LOTS of loud klaxons/sirens etc. You are supposed to be up, dressed, and to your GQ station (even if you just meet somewhere with the other marines and wait) within a couple minutes. Our berthing was just above our main shop so I could throw my coveralls on and be downstairs in 30-45 seconds.

Of course if there's flooding in your assigned space and you're not the one supposed to fix it then you should probably be heading upwards, or if its really bad, topside towards your designated lifeboat.

We ran abandon ship drills pretty regularly, but we never had marines onboard (it was a destroyer).

Edit: I am only replying to the marines' comment above me, not trying to criticize the sailors who tragically died. I am certain that if they survived the initial impact, they did everything they could to make it out.

Some careers are going to be over and maybe much worse if there was gross negligence by whoever was responsible

As a former sailor who did quite a bit of work in the Damage Control Division, I just want to speculate a little about what might have happened onboard the Fitzgerald after being struck.

It is VERY unlikely that some sort of scene from a submarine movie played out, with screaming men being locked in a quickly flooding space. All the watertight doors and hatches on my ship (also a destroyer) opened from both sides, because obviously it would be extremely unsafe to make them not. Most watertight doors,
 especially those leading to commonly accessed spaces like berthings
 (sleeping areas), use a lever type handle that controls all the individual latches at once. Vertical hatches
 at the top of each ladder
 (stairs but steep and narrow) have round wheel handles that spin just like you see in the movies. Most doors and hatches can be opened and closed in a matter of seconds.

My guess is that the collision caused a large-ish hull breach into a crew berthing (and other spaces) and simultaneously killed or disabled (by crushing, remember its a MASSIVE ship that hit them) several of the sleeping crew. Those who could be evacuated were, and the doors were closed to prevent the spread of flooding. The ship will have immediately conducted a count of the crew and identified who was missing. Unfortunately they would not be able to confirm deaths until the damage was contained and it was safe to open the door again.

I just hope nobody was crushed but still alive enough to be subsequently drowned.

Edit: Added some links to help non seafaring folks get a sense of how it looks etc.

Edit 2: If you're wondering how they stopped a leak in a flooded compartment when the hole, or part of it, is underwater and the door has to stay closed, they might adjust fuel (or other ballast), to the tanks on the opposite side of the impact. This would cause the ship to list (lean) in that direction, exposing more of the damaged side of the hull to the air and making it easier to pump the water out of the flooded spaces. If enough of the breach is exposed you can start applying patches and such to make a temporary fix until you get back to port.

Edit 3: By "locked in a quickly flooding space", I meant that I don't believe it's likely that they were purposely locked in. If someone was to close the door on me and I wanted out (because I was worried about the sudden influx of water) I would simply open it using the handle (it even works underwater because they are designed to open "out", towards an evacuation route, like public buildings. Hatches open upward because the flooding is usually not above you.) They would have to be actively holding the handle down against my attempts to open it in order to keep it closed. In addition, as stated below, berthings (places where lots of people gather and sleep) have at least two exits in case a fire or damage blocks one.

As a former sailor who did quite a bit of work in the Damage Control Division, I just want to speculate a little about what might have happened onboard the Fitzgerald after being struck.

It is VERY unlikely that some sort of scene from a submarine movie played out, with screaming men being locked in a quickly flooding space. All the watertight doors and hatches on my ship (also a destroyer) opened from both sides, because obviously it would be extremely unsafe to make them not. Most , especially those leading to commonly accessed spaces like berthings (sleeping areas), use a lever type handle that controls all the individual latches at once. Vertical hatches at the top of each ladder (stairs but steep and narrow) have round wheel handles that spin just like you see in the movies. Most doors and hatches can be opened and closed in a matter of seconds.

My guess is that the collision caused a large-ish hull breach into a crew berthing (and other spaces) and simultaneously killed or disabled (by crushing, remember its a MASSIVE ship that hit them) several of the sleeping crew. Those who could be evacuated were, and the doors were closed to prevent the spread of flooding. The ship will have immediately conducted a count of the crew and identified who was missing. Unfortunately they would not be able to confirm deaths until the damage was contained and it was safe to open the door again.

I just hope nobody was crushed but still alive enough to be subsequently drowned.

Edit: Added some links to help non seafaring folks get a sense of how it looks etc.

Edit 2: If you're wondering how they stopped a leak in a flooded compartment when the hole, or part of it, is underwater and the door has to stay closed, they might adjust fuel (or other ballast), to the tanks on the opposite side of the impact. This would cause the ship to list (lean) in that direction, exposing more of the damaged side of the hull to the air and making it easier to pump the water out of the flooded spaces. If enough of the breach is exposed you can start applying patches and such to make a temporary fix until you get back to port.

Edit 3: By "locked in a quickly flooding space", I meant that I don't believe it's likely that they were purposely locked in. If someone was to close the door on me and I wanted out (because I was worried about the sudden influx of water) I would simply open it using the handle (it even works underwater because they are designed to open "out", towards an evacuation route, like public buildings. Hatches open upward because the flooding is usually not above you.) They would have to be actively holding the handle down against my attempts to open it in order to keep it closed. In addition, as stated below, berthings (places where lots of people gather and sleep) have at least two exits in case a fire or damage blocks one.

Did the Navy contact your family to say he was missing or has passed away? I imagine the entire ship is in river city and none of the crew has been able to contact family until the families of the missing sailors are notified.

My GQ as an infantry Marine on a MEU was in the berthing staying the fuck out of the sailors way. Like, unless you were on duty watching one of the .50's outside, it was to stay in the berthing and not fuck anything up so the sailors could do their drill quickly and resume their day. That's why we were scared...what if this is ever a real-world event and we have been told to stay in the berthing the entire time we practiced this drill?

I can count TWICE- once on each ship underway- going topside for an abandon ship drill.

Agreed. Don't assume that because you haven't heard from them they are dead. The Navy loves to restrict communications during and after emergencies.

Source: 6 years on a destroyer.

Edit: Damn, I feel for you Cyrus. So sorry you had to suddenly lose your brother like this.

Yes, and there was negligence on both ships.

If this isn't the realest and most honest thing I've ever read, I don't know what is.

One of my childhood friends was one of the seven he was from a small town called fluvanna and he never had a problem with anyone he was one of the nicest people I knew I still want to believe he wasn't one of the seven but the news says otherwise. RIP Dakota

Update: thank you everyone for your condolences, and to everyone who didn't believe me or just trolling I know this is Reddit and there are a lot of karma whores but I was just trying to make sure people knew who he was and his background.

Are criminal charges possible if it was negligence of whoever was in command at the time?

In 2012, I watched as the MV Otowasan plowed into the starboard forward quarter of my ship, the USS Porter, which is also a DDG (destroyer, same ship).

These sailors are traumatized. It rocked my life and changed the way I feel about how fragile things are. Even US warship can be involved in an accident like this.

I remember vividly, at 1 am, standing on the starboard bridge wing taking a doze (was a photographer, and was out there because of the Leonid meteor shower / I also gathering intelligence when called upon) and seeing a bright white light that seemed to float above some disturbed waters. I quickly realized this light was in fact moving toward us. I remember no seeing port or starboard running lights. We blasted the horn 6 or so times, and I heard the captain and the navigator screaming in the bridge. The collision alarm sounded and a chief, who I thought kind of didn't like me, grabbed me by the arm and told me to leave. I was shaken beyond belief. He said 'grab onto something, were going to be ok'.

That's when the other ship hit. We took a 35 degree list and our world fucking shook. No, it rung like a bell. Screams and sirens from computer equipment rang. Flooding alarms. Fire alarms. Every alarm. I heard officers dialing into phones yelling 'report!'

The other ship was gone. We had one or two minor injuries. We spend 3 months in port for patch up repairs, and spend weeks in makeshift shelters in port in Dubai with no AC because we had nowhere to sleep. Our home had been damaged beyond our capability of repair.

I feel for these sailors, on a deep level. And I am tore up in so many ways that people like me, and those I made friends with and served with, died in their racks. Unable to escape. I hope they went swiftly.

I didn't know them but I will miss them and think of them.

I haven't looked at these pictures in about a decade, but this is as good a time as any to post some "In the ship" shit. It gets a little gay. Not too gay, just like navy gay. Enjoy!

http://imgur.com/a/NkIFP

edit: If I see the gay is underway comment one more fucking time I'm deleting this fucking post

True in most cases but when ships are in heavy traffic or close to port they are manning the helm. There's also always someone in the wheelhouse on watch

Needs more jerking.

How long were you on a ship? What does an infantryman do on a boat all day long?

I'm sorry for your loss, however it's unclear if you or your brothers next of kin have been notified.

Unless you or his next of kin (notify in case of death) within 24 hours of the event have been contacted by a Navy Chaplin and his escort in person. DO NOT ASSUME ANYTHING. DoD policy is 100% full coms dark for all involved personnel when casualties are involved. Until the family can be notified directly and in person by representatives of the DoD (That branch of service if possible).

The DoD takes this VERY SERIOUSLY particularly in todays day and age of social media. The last thing they want is any members loved one to find out from CNN or their Facebook feed that their loved one was killed.

Sure thing. It might just help. My brother struggled to keep friends because we always moved from state to state, and eventually that took a toll on him. When I became of age, we both were introduced to League of Legends, a popular pc game, and that was how we both just found enjoyment. We were both not very social at the time. I don't wanna say too much, but he was my literal best friend that I shared everything with and hung out with all the time. He truly felt like he belonged when he joined the Navy and met wonderful peers. Again, he was incredibly proud, and I've never seen him smile until he became a sailor.

As a parent, I simply cannot imagine the horror of knowing there was an accident with my child and having to wait for the news. Seven families had a sedan with gov plates pull into their driveway today and every single one of them knew the outcome before anyone got out of the car.

Seven gold star families just had their world shattered, on father`s day weekend no less.

As a person that knows little to nothing about sailing and is seeing all of these terrifying theory's. Your explanation really gave a perspective. Thanks

It's not. You can get emails from family but can't send any outbound emails.

Spouses would argue, river city gets activated, the spouse would feel ignored and people would literally watch their marriage fall apart without being able to respond.

Edit: Only saw this happen a couple times and they were able to smooth things out. I think it's something sailors tell eachother as a reminder of why you shouldn't leave things on bad terms with your family. River city could happen at anytime and who knows how long it will last.

Dude this is in front page... It is NOT a freighter!

One analysis I read had a different take on things. The BBC is using the time the crash was called in to determine the crash, but likely there was some lag between the incident and the official report. In the analysis I read, look at the graph. You see the Crystal make a sudden 90' turn to the right. That is the time of impact, with the impact knocking it off course. Then the autopilot corrects and gets it back on course. The u-turn is the container ship turning around to come back to the scene to offer help, and then you see it u-turn again to resume course after likely being waved off by the Navy ship.

(Again, this was analysis I read elsewhere. I can't vouch for the accuracy, but it would seem to make more sense.)

Former carrier OOD here. These collisions most often happen when the captain is asleep. This collision on the USS Fitzgerald happened at 0230 hours. Another horrific collision that happened at night was the Belknap and the Kennedy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Belknap_(CG-26). Again, the captain was asleep. Can confirm that u/Oysterpoint is spot on in his assessment.

Edit: Some people have asked whether the captain has someone (a number 2 in command) to stand watch while the captain sleeps. Yes, that person is the OOD (Officer of the Deck). Navy commanding officers leave standing orders to call them anytime another vessel will pass within a specified distance. Typically, these disasters occur at night when the OOD fails to wake the captain as directed by the standing orders.

Hold the fuck up here. The USS John F. Kennedy got collided with on the anniversary of JFK'S assassination?

That's some cosmic bullshit right there.

RIVER CITY is the term used for a communications blackout. Sometimes it's accidental and sometimes (like in the event of a sailor's death) it is intentional to allow the chain of command to operate.

I am so Sorry for your loss.

He said that the cargo ship did not appear on the radar

How exactly would a 730-foot long container ship of 29,000 gross tons not be visible on radar, especially one on a military ship?

For the record, River City is never accidental. River City is a deliberate policy and action plan put in place. If it's just something like SHF is down, it's not called River City. Its just "shits broke"

Rest in peace sailors. Thank you for your service.

A BBC article had the container ships path doing a sudden U turn. Was this before or after the crash? Something is fishy.

Edit: source, and note the before

Marine traffic records suggest the ACX Crystal, a 222-metre (730ft) Filipino-flagged container ship, made a sudden U-turn roughly 25 minutes before the crash. It is not known why it changed course.

It amazes me guys can masturbate so often in a single day. After I achieve that one orgasm, I become so tight, it's unbearable to even try for a second orgasm.

Not really. Those container ships sail on autopilot. Saves fuel and whatnot.

Right but sailing a container ship is a lot like sailing an aircraft carrier. It is going to take it a few miles to come to a full stop, it is going to take really wide turns (as in at least a mile). The larger ships at sea always get respect because they have these maneuverability issues. This ship had absolutely no business whatsoever being anywhere near this thing. At all.

Heavy heart. Fair winds and following seas. We have the watch

Either major negligence or an external event that's being covered up. A reverse Tonkin if you will. It's also strange that we have no info on the captain of the ASX Crystal.

Some guys can't, some can. Like for me, I've got no refractory period and some days I'm just never satisfied. It's led to a lot of time wasted.

Write a book

Well said.

Edit: not to steal Mr Aloha's thunder, but a buddy and I once stood in front of a hatch for a few minutes right around the day check/night check handover, just bullshitting. Few more of our squadron guys joined us, and a few minutes later a couple of Marines asked what the line was for.

Without missing a beat in his story, my buddy says it's for the ice cream social. The Marines get in line, and holler at some of their guys. In the space of about ten minutes we had a line going nowhere about 40 bodies deep. My buddy says "Fuck this, we gotta go do tool check" and walks off.

I come down from the maintenance meeting and there's still a fucking line there. Craziest shit ever.

This points directly to negligence or dereliction of duty by someone or multiple people aboard the Navy vessel

It's also strange that we have no info on the captain of the ASX Crystal.

I mean, I really don't think the freighter is that relevant though. The destroyer is so much more agile than the freighter that it might as well be a landmass. Regardless of how dumb the freighter was, the destroyer shouldn't have gotten tboned like that

"USS Fitzgerald: We're a lighthouse; your call..."

I made this comment in a private subreddit to someone who worked on ships:



OK so I'm a little confused about this. After the collision happened I looked up the path of the ACX Crystal on marinetraffic.com and found this: http://i.imgur.com/JuPJ19W.png

News reports state that the collision occurred at 2:30am local time. No timezone stated.

As you can see there's a sudden deviation to the right which would appear to be the result of a collision, but news reports are stating that the collision occurred AFTER this deviation, at 17:30 GMT, after the ship had U-turned. Here's the diagram supplied by the BBC: http://i.imgur.com/ygML4EB.png.

Here's the GMT times marked on the ships course: http://i.imgur.com/fygHiN3.png.

It seems very odd to me that the ship would suddenly deviate from its course at exactly 16:30 GMT (1:30 JST) but then collide at 17:30 GMT (2:30 JST) after doing a U-turn, and not alter its course at all after the collision. so it looks to me like the collision actually occurred at 1:30 local time, contrary to news reports stating 2:30 local time (assuming local time = JST).

The source of ALL the news reports appears to be this release: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=101080 from the US Navy which doesn't actually give a timezone and just states "2:30 am local time". I'm wondering whether the Fitzgerald's onboard time was not GMT+9 (Japan time) and was rather GMT+8 (Philippines time).

I suppose I'm curious whether the course diagrams I linked to mean anything to you, and whether you think it's more likely that the Navy has reported local time as GMT+8 rather than GMT+9 and all the news reports are getting it wrong by stating that the collision occurred AFTER the ACX Crystal's U-turn?



(The question in the final paragraph was directed towards someone who worked in the Royal Navy)

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edit - there is also the theory that the container ship did the U-turn because it was ahead of schedule and needed to burn time to avoid coming into port early. Supposedly 2 stroke ship's engines are designed to be run at a constant speed and doing a u-turn is preferable to reducing power. I looked up the ACX Crystal's engine and it is a 2 stroke of the model 8K80MC-C. source for that theory on the navy subreddit and source for the engine type. If this theory is true then its possible the collision did actually occur around 17:30 GMT.

I made this comment in a private subreddit to someone who worked on ships:

OK so I'm a little confused about this. After the collision happened I looked up the path of the ACX Crystal on marinetraffic.com and found this:

News reports state that the collision occurred at 2:30am local time. No timezone stated.

As you can see there's a sudden deviation to the right which would appear to be the result of a collision, but news reports are stating that the collision occurred AFTER this deviation, at 17:30 GMT, after the ship had U-turned. Here's the diagram supplied by the BBC: http://i.imgur.com/ygML4EB.png.

Here's the GMT times marked on the ships course: http://i.imgur.com/fygHiN3.png.

It seems very odd to me that the ship would suddenly deviate from its course at exactly 16:30 GMT (1:30 JST) but then collide at 17:30 GMT (2:30 JST) after doing a U-turn, and not alter its course at all after the collision. so it looks to me like the collision actually occurred at 1:30 local time, contrary to news reports stating 2:30 local time (assuming local time = JST).

The source of ALL the news reports appears to be this release: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=101080 from the US Navy which doesn't actually give a timezone and just states "2:30 am local time". I'm wondering whether the Fitzgerald's onboard time was not GMT+9 (Japan time) and was rather GMT+8 (Philippines time).

I suppose I'm curious whether the course diagrams I linked to mean anything to you, and whether you think it's more likely that the Navy has reported local time as GMT+8 rather than GMT+9 and all the news reports are getting it wrong by stating that the collision occurred AFTER the ACX Crystal's U-turn?

(The question in the final paragraph was directed towards someone who worked in the Royal Navy)

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.

.

edit - there is also the theory that the container ship did the U-turn because it was ahead of schedule and needed to burn time to avoid coming into port early. Supposedly 2 stroke ship's engines are designed to be run at a constant speed and doing a u-turn is preferable to reducing power. I looked up the ACX Crystal's engine and it is a 2 stroke of the model 8K80MC-C. source for that theory on the navy subreddit and source for the engine type. If this theory is true then its possible the collision did actually occur around 17:30 GMT.

Tokyo Drift; Saltwater.

Yup. A container ship is MUCH less nimble than an aircraft carrier. Can be 3 times as heavy with less propulsion.

So that's what testosterone in a confined space does. So much wrestling hahaha

I was stationed aboard a DDG. Slept in the forward berthing. This is exactly what I thought.

RIVER CITY sounds pleasant.

Having served on a destroyer, I can tell you this is impossible to fully enforce in the modern day. the moment you are near shore (cell phone range), the cat's out of the bag.

Especially with possibly worried family members.

Yea, if destroyer cant notice a ship like that then what the fuck would it do in a battle?

That is just incredibly sad.

You are very welcome. At least I didn't learn all that crap for nothing

Edit: stupid emojis are stupid

The radar wasn't working properly on a guided missile destroyer? How did that happen?

Same here. I can't imagine what it must be like being on the other side of a door getting dogged down and sealed shut when water is rushing in. Fuck

Navigation officer on merchant ships. On board ships we keep BT (board time). We don't necessarily stick to time zones. When we travel to places with different time zones, we will jump hours in a way most convenient to us. Looking at the picture of his past track, i am almost certain the 90degree course change to starboard is the moment of impact. A container vessel making way could not make a 90 degree turn that sharp and abrubt otherwise. After that, the ship returned to her original course and later made a u-turn to return to the position where the impact took place, maybe to give assistance to the stricken vessel.

I'm so sorry. Wanna tell us about growing up with him? Sounds like it might do you good to think of the best of times and I'd be happy to listen while you reminisce on him.

I served on a LSD, so I can say with authority that a Marines day consists of eating, working out, sleeping and standing a single watch.

That sounds like a bad trip

Would if I could. Submit your request to Davy Jones and, if approved, I would love to.

It's not a big deal, but it's a tradition the Navy takes pride in. If another sailor here wants to describe it, I hope they do. But I don't want to be the one to ruin a secret that isn't mine....or piss off King Neptune.

Another comment in this thread directs you to wiki "line-crossing ceremony"

Sounds really bad. But its just the way it is in the military isnt it. I remember being in training and our sergeant said. " Theres 2 brushes and a mop missing, fuck knows what you cunts do with them, you must fucking eat them. Now im not telling you to steal anything. But there better be 2 brushes and a fucking mop here in the Morning. " beg borrow steal. Lmao

This. The running joke was, "my GQ station is my rack."

You cross the equator and you become a trusty shellback.

I would reveal more, but you are a lowly wog. Go away.

"lol autopilot" doesn't shift responsibility from the owner/operator of the vessel

Am I missing something? What is river city?

Zero emergency training for Marines when I was on the MEU. GQ for Marines on ship is pretty much "stay in your berthing and don't leave". I had absolutely no idea how to get from berthing to the flight deck without having to go down a couple of decks and going back up. Never knew where our muster point was, or what lifeboat was ours. If our ship did sink at some point, most of the Marines on board would probably be fucked.

The Kennedy name has some final destination style curse on it...

Just throw on a lil' Icy Hot and you're good to go.

I was a on a carrier, but generally Marines fucked off and hid away from working parties during GQ drills and the Navy practiced all their fire fighting and whatever else they had to do.

right? These ships are supposed to be on alert for warships that are trying to sneak up on them. How do you miss a gigantic slow moving merchant ship going down a shipping lane? What the hell?

A Humv, the guy in the "Gay sailor" outfit with the knife was backing it up when the brakes gave out, the truck started going down the ramp of the ship and he popped the parking brake and jumped out.

Surprised he could because that door is heavy as fuck and was pushing against him.

As a former Yokosuka based sailor, I do remember sometimes ships "idling" outside of the port, waiting for the morning, to come through the harbor and moore pierside (pier 2/3 was ours back then)

If the "rumors" of idling are true, it makes sense that they were just waiting to pull in port, with minimal underway crew, but usually, nothing really happens when you are outside of your homeport waiting for the sunrise, so you can pull in and can shift colors and go home and see family. Especially if they had come in from a few weeks or months deployed, they would be a little more relaxed the night before pulling in.

It's definitely a shitty way to die though. Prayers go out for the families and the loved ones of those involved.

It's sorta like blaming a train for hitting a car.

I'm a wife. My husband is NAVY and often goes on long deployment. He is on a submarine so it's dominantly radio silence for the majority of his deployment.

Getting news like this is my worse (and reoccurring) nightmare

It's where you go to the other side of the world where up is down left is right and cats and dogs live together. Total pandemonium.

Cos if you know your ships... You know that fucker is Huuuuuuuuuuuuggge. And seeing something that big be that agile is unnatural... Like watching NFL

Nope and neither would our trucks tied down on them. But Gunny and LT SWORE to us that the sailors wanted our crew served weapons inside and that if we didn't guard them constantly, then they would disappear.

The sailors assigned to the LCAC stood watch too. I don't know if we stood watch because they stood watch or if they stood watch because they didn't want two Marines on their LCAC without them.

To be fair... when my Marine infantry unit went to Kuwait at an Army base for training on a MEU. We stole shit tons of army supplies that nobody was guarding. Radio batteries, ammunition, food and water. Whatever we could get our hands on. When we were in Afghanistan and went back to an air base. Lots of their stuff went missing too.

Baptism on the line, also called equatorial baptism, is an initiation ritual sometimes performed as a ship crosses the Equator, involving water baptism of passengers or crew who have never crossed the Equator before.[14] The ceremony is sometimes explained as being an initiation into the court of King Neptune.

Damn, this sounds like something straight out of The Sandman. A story based on this would fit in perfectly.

7 sailors died under his command. His naval career is surely over regardless.

If they're not going to force retire him, he'll spend the rest of his time behind a desk

There's only one thief in the Marine Corps. Everyone else is trying to get their shit back.

Yeah he was extremely young. He turned 25 on the 16th, when the ship reportedly crashed.

All that aside, he has stuck up for me once (that I recall). When I was younger, a certain guy always tripped me and would constantly do tiny things that escalated from spitting to actually being more physical to me. My brother got tired of it and gave him the 1, 2 hahaha. But maybe that was owing me for him throwing a gigantic ice cube at my face once thinking I was strong enough to catch it. First thing he says is, "please don't tell mom."

Ah Wog day... I miss it.

The doors and hatches open from both sides. If anyone doesn't get out they most likely are already dead or unconcious when the door is closed.

Needless to say, CO's career in the Navy is over.

Exactly, it's not a freighter, it's an aircraft carrier. Designed for use by the US military for applications that might include wartime activities.

They said piloting a freighter was similar to piloting an aircraft carrier, presumably because of size considerations. However, I would imagine aircraft carriers and frieghters are designed a lot differently.

this, modern commercial container ships are usually run by a pair of diesel-electric motors, not a pair of nuclear reactors like our carriers are. carriers are designed to turn at the drop of a hat to dodge bloody anti-ship missiles if need be, container ships are designed to carry a shit ton of stuff and sail in straight lines.

We need to make the entire Navy out of cargo ships for ultimate stealth advantage.

Is it possible that it could be as simple as two people trying and failing to get out of eachother's way in a hallway? Like they both took the wrong correction at the same time and then again messed it up and ended up hitting anyways?

That's so terrible. Awful to hear.

Look, while you're dealing with this, I want you to know that you can come here and talk to me. You get a lump of something in your throat and you don't know where else to unload it, then come talk to me. I don't fucking matter so if you find yourself with something toxic that you need to let out without hurting anyone close to you, then I'm your guy. That is what I am for to you. He seems like a good egg and if my younger brother were standing where you are, then I'm sure he'd step in and have something to offer.

I've been in a situation or two that I didn't think I would make it out of. At the time all I wanted was for my younger siblings to be okay without me. I wanted them to be strong for my parents and I wanted them to be strong enough without me around.

If there's anything universal about older brothers then his mind was probably on you and other people he loved the most when it happened.

This whole situation is unbelievable and awful. I'm sorry for your loss.

When there is nothing to do all day, might as well stand in line for chow.

Oh, you just ate breakfast? Time to get in line for lunch chow.

Lunch chow over? Gym time is still blue? Might as well wait in line for green hours.

1500? Might as well stand in line for dinner.

Smoking lamp isn't lit and we can't go outside? Might as well line up to smoke a cigarette.

And so it goes.

I was on the Essex doing a replenishment working party when another Marine fucked with the Christmas box looking fire suppression system. Ended up putting the ship into GQ, caused millions of dollars in damage to aircraft, and a minor diplomatic incident by spilling the foam into Subic Bay. So yeah, we mostly just break shit.

With the force of the collision they may have died/been knocked unconscious with the impact.

im on the Yokosuka naval base right now, everyone is down and upset. very quiet here today, and understandably so. its a sad day to hear about fellow sailors passing, and it was an honor serving at the same time, and same base as them. thanks for your service, fair winds and following seas, shipmates.

I served on a LSD, so I can say with authority that a Marines day consists of eating, working out, sleeping and standing a single watch.

I assume it stands for something like Restricted Communications

They should have been keeping proper separation and awareness of their surroundings at all times.

The Navy doesn't play around with the blame game here. If you're in charge of a ship and hit something, you get cashiered. Period.

State of the art computer processors crunching enough data to take down 10's of targets at mach speeds. Able to scan the environment with 5 different radar systems. Created to out maneuver enemy ships hits a giants container ship.

A number of historical collisions are exactly this. In the US, we keep our port to their port (turn to starboard) if we are heading directly for another vessel. Not all areas of the world do this, and some captains have chosen to turn to port for various reasons. However, this situation is different because it was not head on like a hallway.

Yup, that's what it looks like to me, too. It's almost impossible to imagine that either ship was unaware of the other.

Unfortunately, there's no such thing as a law of gross tonnage when it comes to deciding which vessel is must give way. In a crossing situation, under COLREGS Rule 15, the vessel that has the other vessel to starboard shall keep out of the way of the other. Legally, a container ship would be required to keep out of the way a a small powerboat if the container ship had the powerboat to starboard. Now, if the container ship was restricted in it's ability to maneuver, Rule 18 would apply instead of Rule 15 and the small powerboat would have to keep out of the way of the larger vessel. On the open ocean (not in ports) there are specific instances that would make a vessel restricted in ability to maneuver and they all have to do with the nature of the vessel's work (such as landing a helicopter or taking on fuel or laying cable), and size isn't one of them.

Shipyards can do amazing things. It wouldn't surprise me if they are able to fix it.

I think these Sailors endured something like Crimson Tide portrayed. I hope they slept through it. That was always one of my biggest fears in the Navy. Rest In Peace.

Thank you. This is a Congressional hearing question.

UCMJ a commanding officer?!?! HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Ask the three idiot soldiers from Abu Ghraib if their CO was in the cell next to them in Leavenworth ....

Why you gotta steal shit? 50 year old navy hand-me-downs not good enough for you?! Shameful!

Join the Navy and find out. A Trusty Shellback does not discuss the events of a crossing the line ceremony to landlubbers.

Cut out the broken bits, weld in fixed bits. They wont throw away a perfectly good destroyer over a couple of months of dry dock work.